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Thread: Final Arrangements

  1. #41
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    More gruesome than being sliced and diced into your component parts so medical students can examine your abnormalities and cellular structure?

    What Roach says is apparently true, and might still be happening, but at least those crash test cadavers were serving a useful purpose. And at least they weren't transformed into Soylent Green.

    I'm pragmatic enough to be ok with that, as long as the person the body belonged to is ok with it.
    I went out to the lean-to to get some wood last year and there was the remnant of a snake molting stuck to the back of the shed. That's how I see my body once I'm gone. If I were to go the route that GeorgeParker suggests, I don't care if Im a crash dummy or selection of organs to probe. Or organic waste for someone's compost heap. It might be weird to wind up on my own compost heap, however.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  2. #42
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    My dad used to talk about medical school cadaver jokes. The only one I distinctly remember was about putting a penny in the slot.
    Saw a car on my walk just now advertising Water Cremations - that's a new one for me.

  3. #43
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    My dad used to talk about medical school cadaver jokes. The only one I distinctly remember was about putting a penny in the slot.
    Saw a car on my walk just now advertising Water Cremations - that's a new one for me.
    my dad had a photo of his anatomy class cadaver holding a can of beer.

    They are more respectful these days. My dad was embarrassed by it tho by the time his kids saw it.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    Saw a car on my walk just now advertising Water Cremations - that's a new one for me.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    Or organic waste for someone's compost heap. It might be weird to wind up on my own compost heap, however.
    It is now legal to have your body composted, without cremation, in three states.

    "a corpse is placed in a cylinder with organic materials, like wood chips, plants, and straw, then heated and turned repeatedly for several weeks with a hook until it’s broken down into a nutrient-rich soil that can be delivered back to the family or used for planting." https://www.vice.com/en/article/z3xz3j/oregon-has-legalized-human-composting

  6. #46
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    My son used to work for a company which deals with body donations for medical purposes. It is an option suggested to families where a sudden, unplanned death has occurred and they have little to no money for cremation. There are surgical suites on-site and students come in and practice surgeries. What they do and how they do it is rather fascinating. He was always bothered by the amount of money that is exchanged. These families get a free cremation but on the flip side big money is exchanging hands. Oh boy, does he have some stories...
    He was at a family picnic and got paged to go make a pick up. He laughingly said to his uncle that he had to leave to go pick up a box of squids. His uncle shouldn't have asked but did. They often take all the long bones out of the legs and arms and sew them up loosely. So using your imagination think of tentacles. They roll them up and put them in boxes to be picked up and cremated. I thought his uncle was going to faint.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I love Ram Dass. And the same sentiment of "Be Here Now" inspired my avatar, "This is it" by Thich Nhat Hanh. In other words, what else are you looking for other than this moment. This is it.
    A related saying that has been around for a long time is "Wherever you go, there you are." In 1994 the popular book “Wherever You Go, There You Are: Mindfulness Meditation in Everyday Life” by Jon Kabat-Zinn explains it this way:

    Guess what? When it comes right down to it, wherever you go, there you are. Whatever you wind up doing, that’s what you’ve wound up doing. Whatever you are thinking right now, that’s what’s on your mind. Whatever has happened to you, it has already happened. The important question is, how are you going to handle it? In other words, “Now what?”

    Like it or not, this moment is all we really have to work with. Yet we all too easily conduct our lives as if forgetting momentarily that we are here, where we are, and that we are in what we are already in. At every moment we find ourselves at the crossroads of here and now. But when the cloud of forgetfulness over where we are now sets in, in that very moment we get lost. "Now what?" becomes a real problem.

    By lost, I mean that we momentarily lose touch with ourselves and with the full extent of our possibilities. Instead we fall into a robotlike way of seeing and thinking and doing.

    Wherever You Go, There You Are is a very good, non-religious introduction to mindfulness meditation and the concept of being here now.

  8. #48
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    Wow, will not be donating anybody's body to "medical science" which always sounded to noble, until I read this thread.

  9. #49
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    Not to mention what happens at the Dental schools.
    I suppose they need only heads for their dissection.

  10. #50
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I suppose they need only heads for their dissection.
    Nope. In the field of dentistry including dental hygiene, we dissected different parts of the whole body during the anatomy, physiology, histology research. The formaldehyde odour is hard to deal with. That may have changed over the years.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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