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Thread: What are you afraid of?

  1. #41
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    There's also the very real problem of your family or the people you grew up with thinking you've gotten "too big for your britches" if you grew up poor and became successful as an adult or if you grew up in a deeply rural area and left home to live in a big city. Sometimes the people you left behind think you left because you feel like you're better than them, and in some places they'll tell you so to your face or flat out shun you when you come home to visit. So fear of success is a very real phenomenon in those cases, with very real consequences.

    The other part of fear of success is when fear of success is really fear of failure. We all know that when you succeed you get presented with bigger opportunities and bigger challenges, which you're automatically expected to enthusiastically accept. So at a certain level where you're putting a good effort into what you're doing, you become afraid that if you become any better at what you're doing you'll be forced to move upward into a position where you'll fall flat on your face and be totally disgraced. Thus the people who practice martial arts for years but never enter a tournament, or the people who are very good at their job and are afraid they'll be offered a promotion.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    In the 1970s a car went off a bridge and fell into Lake Lanier (a TVA-type lake in north Georgia). Divers who went down looking for the car to recover the body, came back to the surface scared sh_tless. They said there were houses down there and a lot of dead trees and abandoned powerlines, and the water was very muddy near the bottom. But what had really scared them was having a couple of 8-9 foot catfish suddenly swim by them just a few yards away in the murky water.

    For people who think giant catfish are an urban legend, here is a photo of a small giant catfish:

    Attachment 3954



    I never understood the attraction of catfish “tickling”.

  3. #43
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    Lightning. Where I grew up was on a peninsula. Because of the geography, storm clouds were mostly blown out to sea. Lightning was something that happened at a distance. DH grew up in the midwest and he's just Ho-Hum, it's lightning, which is fine.

  4. #44
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    So I'm walking at night, because if I have a fear of something, I've forgotten it, the fear was of not getting adequate exercise I believe? That's scary bad for one's health! And then walking back, there is an animal running, snorting, guttural, animal, moving fast. And I'm like "oh @#$# coyote, what do I do, what do I do?". Not the first time there has been a coyote on that very street ... And then it's just a runner and a dog. The dog is kind of wild itself, snorting, hardly controlled, but of course I trust the person to control it though they are struggling to. (I actually have seen an actual coyote on that very street before). And my chest hurts from the adrenaline.

    And the thing is I've taken presentations on coyotes, on bears etc.. but I panic. Only even actual coyotes are not supposed to be a danger to any human larger than a baby, but the anticipated coyotes on dark streets loom larger in the imagination. Mind you I wouldn't even be afraid of them if I hadn't seen them there before.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
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    I'm not scared of wild animals when walking but I am afraid of criminals. Someone exposed himself to my neighbor when she was jogging so I try to stay aware of my surroundings. I also don't hike alone. On my vacation my brother will be going some places with me.

  6. #46
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    A few days ago I encountered a fear I didn't know I had. I went to a clinic so they could do an upper endoscopy (same as a colonoscopy but on the other end) and stretch a tight spot in my esophagus. As they're doing the final prep and about to put you to sleep, they put a thing like this photo in your mouth to keep your jaws open during the procedure.

    Endo Mouthpiece.jpeg

    It's hard plastic and your mouth has to be wide open for it to fit in -- not uncomfortably wide open, but just short of that. Call it ~1.5 inch (the size of a golf ball).

    After they they put it in I consciously kept my mouth relaxed, but even so, having that thing between my teeth and the plate around it pressing on my lips because it's held in place by an elastic band, made me instantly feel like they had put a gag in my mouth (with all the sinister implications that carries).

    I stayed calm and took several deep breaths through my mouth to reassure myself that the big hole in the middle really was there and I could breath just fine. But I still felt subconsciously like I had a gag in my mouth. It was a scary feeling, and totally irrational. On top of which I have never encountered that fear before, and I have no reason to believe I will ever be restrained and gagged.

    Has anyone else had an upper endoscopy and experienced that same reaction? Or am I just weird?
    Last edited by GeorgeParker; 9-16-21 at 1:14am. Reason: clarity

  7. #47
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    George: I did have an upper endoscopy once, but I must have been asleep by the time they got to this part.

  8. #48
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    George: I did have an upper endoscopy once, but I must have been asleep by the time they got to this part.
    My DH has upper endoscopies from time to time--in fact he just had one a couple of weeks ago--and I've never heard him talk about the jaw opener, so, like rosa, I suspect that they put him to sleep first. I can see how that would be an unsettling feeling, though.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    My DH has upper endoscopies from time to time--in fact he just had one a couple of weeks ago--and I've never heard him talk about the jaw opener, so, like rosa, I suspect that they put him to sleep first. I can see how that would be an unsettling feeling, though.
    In my case they put the mouth thing in, then attached an oxygen thing to it. I've seen photos online of upper endoscopy where they have an oxygen tube stuck up the person's nose, but I guess this place considers supplying oxygen through the mouth a better practice.

    Anyway they told me what they were doing in each step just before they did it and they were very gentle and soothing in everything they did, I just wasn't expecting my subconscious fear reaction. Heck, when I had an MRI (where they totally strap you to the table so you can't move and put you in a small tube) it didn't bother me a bit. But this did. It's funny what we react to sometimes and what we don't.

    (Maybe I was Trixie Belden in a previous life and some villain tied me up and put a gag in my mouth )

  10. #50
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    This thread has reminded me of something that happened when I was in boarding school.

    Three of us were sent to get a tetanus shot. It must have been a routine scheduled vaccination, because we weren't injured and we didn't know each other.

    Anyway. It was me (8th grade) a bigger boy (probably 10th grade) and a little boy I'll call Bobby (5th-6th grade). The three of us walk into the nurse's office and as she's getting out the stuff to vaccinate us, poor little Bobby looks very nervous, turns around, takes a step toward the corner of the room and stands there staring at the corner.

    The 10th grader and I look at each other and he does the finger-on-lips "silence" signal. Just then the nurse says "who's going to be first?" The big boy gives her the silence signal, holds up his hand like a cop stopping traffic, and visually counts five seconds using his fingers. Then he cheerfully says "Ok Bobby, we're done. It's your turn." Bobby turns around and the 10th grader says "Come on, there's nothing to it."

    So Bobby, thinking it only took a few seconds for both of us to get the shot, bravely walks over, gives the nurse his arm, and looks the other way while she jabs him. It was obvious from his face that it hurt, but he wasn't about to say ouch in front of big kids if we didn't say ouch. IOW he was a perfect little soldier because we had tricked him into thinking it wouldn't be bad.

    You should have seen the look on Bobby's face when the 10th grader and I both rolled up our sleeves and he realized he'd been tricked. He didn't look mad at all, just astonished. Very very astonished.

    We did it for Bobby's own good of course, because shots hurt less if you're not afraid. And I've always admired that 10th grader's cleverness in quickly knowing what to do so Bobby would be less afraid.

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