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Thread: Taking you parentsís stuff

  1. #11
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    We are a family of artists so I took several paintings done by both my mother and grandmother. Other than those, very little. I saved some personal items that really felt like the essence of who they were. For my dad his old fishing creel hung next to a vintage framed photo of Lost Lake and Mt Hood along with some of his Pendleton clothing. The mantel clock from the kitchen that always seemed like the heartbeat of the home and some well loved vintage kitchen crockery and cookbooks. Now that I think about it, the contents of their potting shed into the one my dad helped me build.

  2. #12
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    My parents never had anything high end so I only wanted the sewing machine that my mom got in 1953 and that I learned to sew on. Ended up with it and money which is pretty impersonal. Oh, and my brother returned all the gift items I had made that my parents had on their walls. My other brother did more with the data and photos than I ever would so we made sure he got them.

    My husband wanted one old gun with some history from my Dad but due to shipping complications, we let my brother have it. No where to put it and no one to leave it to.

  3. #13
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Much of her adult life my mom's main hobby was embroidery. Counted thread cross stitch, to be specific. She was quite good at it, winning best in show at the state fair several years in a row back in the 80's before she quit going because there just wasn't any competition. She even started mounting her own work before having it framed because none of the framers in town did a good enough job for her. The artwork on the walls of their home was entirely stuff she had done. It was all quite nice but I don't want to live in a home that looks like my mother decorated it. So I took 3 of my favorites, along with her hope chest, a really nice cedar chest, a chiming mantle clock and my dad's childhood rocking chair that had also been my childhood rocking chair. It wasn't really intentional but all of this stuff except one piece of embroidery is now the decoration of my work office. Occasionally on zoom calls I've had people ask about the chair.

    stuff.jpg

  4. #14
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    Very cool, jp1. The chest is beautiful and I really like the globe.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi
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  5. #15
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    From my mom's house I ended up with a tramp art chest that she always said was a wedding present from her cousin. It is like a patchwork crazy quilt except all the geometric pieces are made of cigar box wood. Most everything else I let go of save for a few Orrefors vases and an old Victorian mirror. All of these things I love for their memories.

  6. #16
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    There is a table that belonged to my grandmother that I would like, however, with the new house, I may not have a good place for it. What I am thinking of, is taking measurements and making a little smaller version for a spot I need a plant stand in the new house. I have some walnut left that needs a project.

    Other then that, maybe some old quilts, photographs and a few specialized tools.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    I took a few furniture pieces that I liked. I have already given my kids what they want except for my dining room table and chairs which only my youngest wants.

  8. #18
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    When my mother died, as I've stated several times here, she had close to nothing. She became severely disabled at age 50, my uncle offered to store all her stuff in his barn and sell her condominium (no proceeds there), and then the barn burned down (maybe mysteriously?) with all the furniture my mother had collected, as well as 95% of her personal effects--and some of mine as well (like my wedding dress).

    Out of the one box of stuff and one bag of clothing she owned at the time of her death, I took her second-hand reversible rain slicker and her Timex watch.

    I still have some of her furniture that I saved shortly after she got sick, before my uncle liquidated her condominium--an Ethan Allen dining table with ladder back chairs and an antique deacon's bench.
    From my father, who died destitute on the side of a building in the Bowery, I have two oil paintings he painted as well as the last birthday card he sent me ("Dear [Catherine], I don't have any money, but if love is worth anything, enclosed is a million dollars for you."). I gave the paintings to my son who has more wall space, and who loves having artwork that symbolizes personal connections.

    As unfortunate as my parents' lives were I find the stories of those who are dealing with the opposite problems of trying to figure out how to divest of estates while fighting toxic relationships at the same time to be as unfortunate if not moreso. I am so sorry for what many of you have gone through and continue to go through.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  9. #19
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    Well, I literally just got back from my last visit to my parents house, so here is what I brought back in the car

    • all the letters and pictures I could find
    • tons of papers that I will sort through here.
    • Two fly rods
    • Two crystal vases
    • a footstool that was my grandmother's; I think her mother did the crewel
    • some little silver pieces to be split among the grandchildren
    • arrowheads, ditto
    • a Quistgaard casserole dish
    • turkey and nightingale calls
    • Dad's compass, which I gave to my grandson
    • a pocket knife that I gave Dad when I was seven, which I gave to my son
    • an Irish wool sweater of my mother's
    • my dad's handkerchiefs, since when I was little and would cry, he'd always pull out a clean, ironed handkerchief for me
    • other little stuff; buyer will mail me my prepacked boxes, and I honestly can't remember what is in there except I know it's more papers and photos and a box of Dad's childhood books and a tablecloth and an orange outdoor power cord
    • my mom's rolling pin and three apple peelers!

  10. #20
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    That's great that you had the opportunity to get those sentimental items, Tybee.

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