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Thread: ? For Those Who Can Work Remotely?

  1. #21
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    And roger presented a good example. Although to be fair most IT systems people can also work remote now since most systems are in the cloud now. When I get helped by the help desk at work they are also in the comfort of their home staring at my screen remotely.

    I was thinking of the millions of office jobs that people had back in the 90ís that were absolutely chained to an office that no longer need to be today.

  2. #22
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Personally, I'm just happy for anyone who can escape office work.

  3. #23
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    Itís all behind me now, but I found it easier to work at an office rather than at home, with itís various temptations and distractions. As I advanced in my career, I found it easier to train, encourage and threaten my subordinate symbol manipulators in person. I also found it more convenient to be in person when making excuses, begging for resources or managing the expectations of my superiors. Plus, I enjoyed going out for lunch with people who arenít named on my 1040.

  4. #24
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    When the hotel SO works at shut down last summer he briefly tried working from home. He brought home a table, a couple of monitors and a desk chair. And for three days he attempted to get work done. It became apparent that this just wasn't working for him. On the fourth day, and every day after that, he drove to the hotel and worked in a massive building that had approximately 20 other people (mostly engineers and security to make sure the building didn't suffer harm) in it at any given time. Apparently some part of his temperament just wasn't suited for working remotely.

  5. #25
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I need people “above” me and “below” me to keep me working on track.

    In retirement I do work for various organizations, those people are my peers for the most part and it works ok, but I do like a stern talking to now and then.

    I find a certain degree of comfort in the National Garden Club’s military-like procedures and hierarchy. There is less flailing around to get work done than in my hobby groups and neighborhood organization that has flatter hierarchy, requiring much negotiation.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    It’s all behind me now, but I found it easier to work at an office rather than at home, with it’s various temptations and distractions. As I advanced in my career, I found it easier to train, encourage and threaten my subordinate symbol manipulators in person. I also found it more convenient to be in person when making excuses, begging for resources or managing the expectations of my superiors. Plus, I enjoyed going out for lunch with people who aren’t named on my 1040.
    I was the exact opposite. I loved being forgotten and invisible at home. I could crank out my work in WAY less time at home. There were no interruptions or chitchat to distract me from the task at hand. It was easy to check if the work was being completed because cases were turned in. There was concrete documentation. I know a few people in my position who also could not maintain the dicipline needed to work from home. I only went into the office when absolutely necessary. As they say... different strokes...

  7. #27
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    I find offices to have distractions, my own apartment, nope not really, the leaf blowers that come around once a week maybe? I brought my own lunch most days, so no I didn't waste money or calories going out to lunch except maybe once a month or so. It was another day, another salad that I had to force myself to make the night before, tired after a day of work and grumbling about: "so sick of making salad". Yea well, beats sitting at the desk and having no lunch though.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #28
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frugal-one View Post
    It was easy to check if the work was being completed because cases were turned in. There was concrete documentation.
    This is how it is with my job too. Boss (or anyone on our team) can pull a report that shows how many insurance submissions we've each received, how many we've quoted, how many deals we've closed, how much premium was booked and what was the average rate increase/decrease for renewal accounts. Metrics like those are what most of my annual goals are based on.

    One of my coworkers loves working from home because she can stop at 3:00 to go pick up her kids from school and make dinner for the family. Then after her husband gets home and they've eaten dinner she logs back in and works a couple more hours while he helps the kids with homework, gets them ready for bed, etc.

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