Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: First World Problems

  1. #1
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    13,103

    First World Problems

    It is interesting to see what some people think of as "serious problems".

    Here's an example: A former colleague of mine posted this on FB today:

    I'm having my first serious confrontation with supply chain issues. Our 11-year-old dishwasher has stopped working. Repair would cost $400. Getting a new one is difficult - the model we want is, as one store put it - "best case is mid to late February, and there's really no guarantee." The website won't even let you put in an order for it. Another big store said their delivery dates keep getting pushed back. Again, they wouldn't take an order, so I can't even get in line for one. I don't really want to buy a model that I don't want just because I can get it sooner.

    #1 Is this really a "serious" issue?
    #2 Is the thought of actually hand-washing dishes until she can get her preferred dishwasher that odious? She's retired and only she and her husband live in the house
    #3 Does she HAVE to have exactly what she wants?
    #4 Why is the thought of repair so out of the question? One of the comments she got on this post was from someone who said that she'd make a repairman very happy, and she'd get to keep her dishwasher in service much quicker.

    If this were me, and I really liked the model I chose, I'd hand wash until I could get the new one. Or I would get someone in to fix it. But I surely wouldn't lose sleep over it. My dishwasher broke 3 years ago and I still haven't gotten it fixed.

    This thread isn't worth the time I'm spending on it, but that post just made me think about how people view their problems. As simple livers, do you more quickly identify first world problems than most other people?
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    7,918
    Yes, I think I identify first world problems quicker than others when it comes to lifestyle and expenditures.

    When it comes to individual liberties some probably see me as a first world problem person. After all, what is a mask mandate compared to the Philippines where Duterte is having unvaccinated people who leave their houses arrested? (He previously dealt with drug abuse by having death squads kill addicts.) But I am concerned about the slippery slope of allowing healthocracies to run unchecked.

    So for me it depends is it a matter of principle or one of convenience.
    Last edited by Yppej; 1-8-22 at 1:50pm. Reason: Fix spelling

  3. #3
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    2,634
    Yes, I consider it a first world problem when people complain about an issue when other alternatives are easily available without undue burden. My stove died this week (15 years old so getting a new controller board would be difficult/impossible to find), and didn't have an issue getting a replacement at Lowe's. They had several available within my (low) budget range and it should be here in a week or so. I'm not a fancy/picky buyer for most items, I actually don't want all the bells and whistles, because there is more to go wrong.

    I know folks of course who want what they want when they want it, and will complain loudly if they aren't getting what they think they are entitled to. I usually do the eye roll to myself.

  4. #4
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    8,167
    I am grateful I live in the First World but in recognizing that, I do so adjust to "it is what it is" without too much grumbling, most of the time anyway. It is the grumbling that makes it a First World problem.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  5. #5
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Always logged in
    Posts
    21,474
    Of course it’s a first world problem.


    I haven’t even ordered our dishwasher for Hermann because the Lowe’s guy advised us to order one manufactured in the United States due to supply chain problems, but it’s not a Bosch. I think I want a Bosch. Because we are getting one with a cabinet panel, that is double first world problem because it is faaaaancy.


    But Catherine I can bloody well wash dishes by hand while we wait for a dishwasher and it might be months. That is ok! But damn I have to get it ordered first.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    5,217
    Quote Originally Posted by herbgeek View Post
    Yes, I consider it a first world problem when people complain about an issue when other alternatives are easily available without undue burden. My stove died this week (15 years old so getting a new controller board would be difficult/impossible to find), and didn't have an issue getting a replacement at Lowe's. They had several available within my (low) budget range and it should be here in a week or so. I'm not a fancy/picky buyer for most items, I actually don't want all the bells and whistles, because there is more to go wrong.

    I know folks of course who want what they want when they want it, and will complain loudly if they aren't getting what they think they are entitled to. I usually do the eye roll to myself.
    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    I am grateful I live in the First World but in recognizing that, I do so adjust to "it is what it is" without too much grumbling, most of the time anyway. It is the grumbling that makes it a First World problem.
    I agree! I can understand a bit of "frustrated grumbling" about something once... maybe twice... but continued whining and complaining usually ends up falling on deaf ears and just makes the individual come across as extremely self-centered/selfish. I think maybe most people feel so accustomed to living at a certain level and/or degree of comfort, that any deviation is taken as a personal affront to them.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi
    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. HH Dalai Lama
    In a world where you can be anything - be kind. Unknown

  7. #7
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Always logged in
    Posts
    21,474
    I hand washed dishes when we spent time in our Hermann house and it made me wonder how much real time is saved by a dishwasher. I could probably take it or leave it. Some people are attached to the idea of sanitizing their dishes, that long hot wash provided by a dishwasher is important, but that is not important for me.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    12,278
    I would just order one that is in stock because I despise washing dishes. But it’s a trivial issue.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    1,446
    Our Bosch went belly up. They couldn't get the parts. We couldn't get a new one. We bought a much cheaper one that they had in stock. I hate it but it does get the dishes clean.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,344
    Not really, because as I don't like to be continually buying things I want quality, which is kind of to say, I want what I want. I think it keeps me from buying things, oh well there's nothing that meets my criteria anyway :P But I don't even have a dishwasher ...

    But if I was in that situation, I would wash dishes by hands for a year or something rather than buy a model I'd be unhappy with. Although I'd probably just get it fixed!!!! I MEAN DUH, OBVIOUS ANSWER, OBVIOUS ANSWER *blinking lights*. Simple living is always opting for the get it fixed answer IMO (although with cars and stuff you eventually do reach the end of the line)

    I do understand the wear and tear on people, it's been nearly 2 years of this, shortages of this, and then shortages of that. When it wasn't dishwashers it was toilet paper, or canned beans and dried grains, hand sanitizer, masks, covid tests, clothes stores closed (currently) because of a covid outbreaks etc.. It's not that I need that much, but it's the memory of how smooth it all seemed to run back in 2019. And things continue to degrade in quality too, that frustrates me more than anything maybe. And sometimes you meal plan, you make a grocery lists, you spend a bunch of time on this, and then hey 1/3 of the things aren't at the store, ok so much for those plans. I suspect all that is kind of just the world we live in now though. When the world is running down, you make the best of what's still around. Kinda.
    Trees don't grow on money

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •