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Thread: What $2 million gets you in San Francisco

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    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    What $2 million gets you in San Francisco

    https://www.zillow.com/homes/320-Day...5183314_zpid/?

    It survived the 1906 earthquake. Will it survive the real estate boom of 2022 or will the new owners tear it down and put up some dreadful HGTV monstrosity?

    An interesting tidbit I learned from the following article about it. Building records were largely destroyed in the earthquake/fire so 1900 was commonly used as the date for any building where the records about it had been lost.

    https://thefrontsteps.com/2021/09/20...y-worst-house/

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    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Unbelievable!

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/320-Day...5183314_zpid/?

    It survived the 1906 earthquake. Will it survive the real estate boom of 2022 or will the new owners tear it down and put up some dreadful HGTV monstrosity?

    An interesting tidbit I learned from the following article about it. Building records were largely destroyed in the earthquake/fire so 1900 was commonly used as the date for any building where the records about it had been lost.

    https://thefrontsteps.com/2021/09/20...y-worst-house/
    i saw that in the Interior design reddit I frequent, or somewhere.

    I can’t believe it’s in a neighborhood with no code forbidding tear downs. That’s crazy. Surely some of those SF neighborhoods have protections for those frail old Victorians. What is WRONG with you people?

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    https://www.zillow.com/homes/320-Day...5183314_zpid/?

    It survived the 1906 earthquake. Will it survive the real estate boom of 2022 or will the new owners tear it down and put up some dreadful HGTV monstrosity?

    https://thefrontsteps.com/2021/09/20...y-worst-house/
    That's my bet. Although it looks like it may have already been through some changes throughout the years. Yet, the front door, the hallway chandelier, and the kitchen built-ins may be close to original.

    I know that everyone has their own thing, and values different things, but I have to say, I paid $164,000 for my space, which probably doesn't have much less square footage than that house for $2M, I know I am just as happy here as anyone who might live there. Yes, San Francisco is amazing. I always enjoyed going there on business (except for the time I ate oysters at the Embarcadero, not realizing I'm allergic to them and spent the entire transcontinental flight back to Newark in the airplane bathroom).

    I wonder if with the migration of workers who will now be permitted to work from home beyond COVID will cause the real estate markets in all major cities to deflate, as the New York market seems to be doing.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post

    I can’t believe it’s in a neighborhood with no code forbidding tear downs. That’s crazy. Surely some of those SF neighborhoods have protections for those frail old Victorians. What is WRONG with you people?
    My limited knowledge of the subject is that it's about as difficult to get a permit to tear something down as it is to get permits to build or renovate. Probably the most likely scenario for this house is that the outside of it will remain intact but the inside will end up looking nothing like it does now. Some friends of ours in the city did this when they bought a monstrously large old 2 family house in the Castro. It's quite nice now but when one is inside it there is no sense of being in a 100 year old house.

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    My humble abode recently crossed the million-dollar mark on Redfin. It's to laugh. So net worth-wise, I'm a paper millionaire.


    I'm with Iris Lily--that down at the heels Victorian lady needs to be preserved. They're not making any more of them.

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    My limited knowledge of the subject is that it's about as difficult to get a permit to tear something down as it is to get permits to build or renovate. Probably the most likely scenario for this house is that the outside of it will remain intact but the inside will end up looking nothing like it does now. Some friends of ours in the city did this when they bought a monstrously large old 2 family house in the Castro. It's quite nice now but when one is inside it there is no sense of being in a 100 year old house.
    that is fine, I can live with that, a preserved exterior.

    But Victorian renovations that take everything down to the studs and re-create contemporary interiors do not age well. I see that my neighborhood all the time. Our house was down to the studs reno with the first floor basically OK although it is “open” in that we removed pocket doors between the living room and dining room. One door was missing anyway. It’s a small house so that’s fine, but our upstairs plan and finishes are 1990s and it shows.

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    I know people who can afford houses in San Francisco, but they are upper middle class to rich and come from money as well. Just as I know people who can afford something in Southern CA besides a tiny house or a condo but they are upper middle class to rich as well and often married money. And I am middle middle class and had neither a sugar daddy, nor a rich real daddy, so that's not me.
    Trees don't grow on money

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    My grandmother's house had glass pocket doors on either side of a central staircase. I hope no one has mucked up that house--it was beautiful.

    I've seen some darling small houses in the LA area. One of my favorites was an old trailer. The new owner had decorated it in eclectic/Boho style. It had a decent yard, and she had three dogs--so she was thrilled with that and its proximity to the beach.

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    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Crazy but then I am not of the nostalgia tribe. I love history and unique homes from different eras but give me a well-built (well built is really important and rare in today's quick stick style) modern home anytime.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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