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  1. #21
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nswef View Post
    IL, It is wonderful when the younger people start taking over the jobs and even passions of the founders. Many organizations don't have that happening, so I guess they will just die out from lack of interest. Glad that's not so with the Iris.
    Oh I think the replacement rate is about 1 newbie for every 12 - 15 oldsters.

    Someone remarked on the aged population sitting at the Iris convention banquet, and how we have all gotten older. So many of these people got into this Iris hobby 20, 30, 40 years ago. We are not seeing that level of dedication in any other plants societies. As far as garden clubs, well, when the garden clubs continue to meet in the middle of the day at the home of a lady or two, that pretty much limits who can/will come.

  2. #22
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    I joined a couple of garden groups when I moved here. The largest and oldest one is comprised mostly of older women. The two native plant groups are mostly younger I guess because they are more attuned to sustainability and environmental issues.

  3. #23
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    I joined a couple of garden groups when I moved here. The largest and oldest one is comprised mostly of older women. The two native plant groups are mostly younger I guess because they are more attuned to sustainability and environmental issues.
    The only young people I know interested in ornamentals (with 3 exceptions) are all about Natives.

    Since I am interested mostly in hybrids, I can’t relate, although I have nothing against those old natives that actually survive in my perennial beds.

    I wont get on my soapbox about how boring natives are to me, ‘cause no one really cares about that do they?? But I will tell you that when it comes to drought, go to the genus iris because it is a sweet sweet plant in drought times. In your part of the country the Arils thrive with little to no water. In my area of the country bearded iris are fine put outside in any location and watered only when Mother
    nature decides to make it rain.

    Modern iris have many more flowers than species and historics, so there’s a lot more there for pollinators to get.

  4. #24
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I am part of a FB group "Native Plants of the Northeast" and I am actively trying to use more natives in my garden. I figure it's good for the ecosystem but also limits my decision-making!!! My God, if I didn't have some boundaries I would die of indecision! So I concentrate on Columbine, echinacea, rudbeckia, New England aster, and this year I'm adding some native shrubs like hydrangea and possibly elderberry or serviceberry.

    Our native iris is Blue Flag, and I was thinking of planting some down by the lakeshore because from what I understand, they tolerate wet conditions. Is that true, IL?
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  5. #25
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Is there an indigenous plant/wildflower group? That would be my preference. But I'm not much of a joiner.

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    The Colorado Native Plant Society has a lot of informational webinars and great field trips into the prairies and mountains. The thing about hybrids is that I can't trust that their seeds will be true. And I am a seed starting nut - 200+ this year of natives and perennials. Wild Seed Project has good info for the northeast.

  7. #27
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I am part of a FB group "Native Plants of the Northeast" and I am actively trying to use more natives in my garden. I figure it's good for the ecosystem but also limits my decision-making!!! My God, if I didn't have some boundaries I would die of indecision! So I concentrate on Columbine, echinacea, rudbeckia, New England aster, and this year I'm adding some native shrubs like hydrangea and possibly elderberry or serviceberry.

    Our native iris is Blue Flag, and I was thinking of planting some down by the lakeshore because from what I understand, they tolerate wet conditions. Is that true, IL?

    “Blue Flag” has no meaning to me, it is what everyone’s grandma calls plants in the genus Iris.

    If you are talking about a bearded variety of Iris, no, they do not want to be wet. Do not drown them! They will rot.


    If you are talking about a Louisiana Iris, yes they like to be wet. If you are talking about a Japanese Iris, and I would think your winter conditions are too harsh for Japanese Iris, they love being wet as well. If you are talking about spuria Iris well, they kind of like some wetness. Siberians— I’m not sure how much water they will tolerate.

  8. #28
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    The Colorado Native Plant Society has a lot of informational webinars and great field trips into the prairies and mountains. The thing about hybrids is that I can't trust that their seeds will be true. And I am a seed starting nut - 200+ this year of natives and perennials. Wild Seed Project has good info for the northeast.
    Their seeds will NOT be true.

    But with Lily and iris, they clone themselves so fast when they’re happy there is no need for dealing with seeds. Only the hybridizes and serious Iris folks grow new varieties from seed.

  9. #29
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    “Blue Flag” has no meaning to me, it is what everyone’s grandma calls plants in the genus Iris.

    If you are talking about a bearded variety of Iris, no, they do not want to be wet. Do not drown them! They will rot.


    If you are talking about a Louisiana Iris, yes they like to be wet. If you are talking about a Japanese Iris, and I would think your winter conditions are too harsh for Japanese Iris, they love being wet as well. If you are talking about spuria Iris well, they kind of like some wetness. Siberians— I’m not sure how much water they will tolerate.
    This is what I'm talking about:

    https://plants.gardeners.com/1210001...Blue_Flag_Iris
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  10. #30
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    ah! Ok, it is Iris versicolor.

    I do not grow that species, but judging by the fact that it gets to be 4 feet tall, and it likes water, its growing conditions sound similar to Louisiana irises which like boggy conditions where the water goes in and then dries out and then goes in again and then dries out.

    Marti Schaeffer and Jan Sacks hybridize versicolor iris, so if your species one does well you might want to branch out and try more species crosses that are still species:


    http://www.jpwflowers.com/introirisversicolor.html

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