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Thread: Anyone start their own seedlings anymore?

  1. #21
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    I hope I'm not jinxing myself, but these are the peas I started from seeds. There are a couple of flowers starting to show up.

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  2. #22
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by happystuff View Post
    I hope I'm not jinxing myself, but these are the peas I started from seeds. There are a couple of flowers starting to show up.

    DSC03062.jpg
    They look great! These are peas for eating, not floral sweet peas, right?

  3. #23
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I have flowering sweet peas as volunteers in my Hermann garden every year. They are such an old fashion flower, you seldom see them in the manicured lawns of suburbia.

    I guess they come up from seed each year? Do you all know? My garden they always seem to come up around about the same place so I haven’t really explored where they’re coming from. There is a mother lode planting of sweet peas about half a mile away And I assume my sweet pea patch came from the mother lode.

  4. #24
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    I believe there are perennial sweet peas.

  5. #25
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    I believe there are perennial sweet peas.
    There are! I have them, but they don't have the fragrance of the annual type. Their flowers also don't have that etheral, watercolor look of annual sweet peas.

  6. #26
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbgeek View Post
    There are! I have them, but they don't have the fragrance of the annual type. Their flowers also don't have that etheral, watercolor look of annual sweet peas.
    Now that you two mention it, I remember seeing and probably planting annual sweet peas in different colors…pinks lavenders, blues. Pinkytoe is probably right that mine is a perennial.

  7. #27
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I started some from seed this year, annuals, because I want to smell them. My plants are alive and well, but no sign of flowers.

  8. #28
    Senior Member KayLR's Avatar
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    My sweet peas are JUST starting to flower. But we've had the coldest, wettest, un-sunshiniest June in memory.
    My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&Ms and a chocolate cake. I feel better already!

  9. #29
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I plant all of my spring greens from seed in the early spring time. Kale, spinach, etc. Squash and cucumbers direct sow from seed. This year I made a small trellis and planted Scarlett Runner beans as an experiment. The seeds are supposedly from an ancient heirloom variety from central America. Humble opinion is that a person needs some basic inexpensive grow lights and possibly a tray warmer to do well starting seedling indoors. I've tried it with just the basic box store starter tray with several cells for seedlings plus some window sunlight and it worked, but the survival rate from seed to flourishing plant was pretty low. I was doing mostly perennials and tomatoes, but might have better luck with others.

  10. #30
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    I tried scarlet runner beans from seed a few years back. The intense UV light here burnt them to a crisp so they might do best in a spot that gets a little relief from the sun. Getting ready to plant bush green bean seeds in a few spots. I also started lemon cukes from seed and they are doing great.

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