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Thread: A fun new thing - Pottery Class!

  1. #11
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    how fun! I took a pottery class ages ago and loved it. Didn't make anything exciting or too large, lots of fun little pots and pitchers and stuff. I only have one or two things left. I do remember liking the electric wheel more than the treadle or kick. Looking forward to hearing about your work!! I also remember that it was really messy!

  2. #12
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I took a jewelry class--loved the drill press! Who knows why.

  3. #13
    Senior Member KayLR's Avatar
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    That sounds really fun. I'd like to try that I think!
    My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&Ms and a chocolate cake. I feel better already!

  4. #14
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by early morning View Post
    how fun! I took a pottery class ages ago and loved it. Didn't make anything exciting or too large, lots of fun little pots and pitchers and stuff. I only have one or two things left. I do remember liking the electric wheel more than the treadle or kick. Looking forward to hearing about your work!! I also remember that it was really messy!
    All of the wheels are electric. It is very messy indeed! It's funny because I don't like to get dirty, but I do like to garden, do woodworking, and now pottery, which are all pretty messy endeavors.
    An interesting aside - The Clay School is located in the old Lydia Pinkham factory building. It's one of those places that rents out space to an interesting assorting of businesses, many of them creative. Apparently TCS was causing issues with the old plumbing system, because clay and plumbing are not a winning combination. So now there is a really good graywater system for cleaning up and keeping clay out of the plumbing, and a lot of recycling practices are in place to recycle clay, as well as pieces of plastic, etc. used to package clay and to wrap the creations while they are drying.

  5. #15
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    "all electric" - that just shows you how old I am *snicker*. I'd really love to live in New England - sooo much history (I have one of Lily the Pink's bottles in my window sill as a vase as we speak...) Many ofld factory buildings could make great venues for all sorts of things, and I hate it when they are torn down. New England seems to protect the physical history of places much better than we do here in the Midwest. Or so it seems from this side of the "fence". Any pottery photos to share? I'm sure we'd all love to see!

  6. #16
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Early: Here are some works in progress. The 3 items in the foreground are mine. Nothing too impressive just yet!
    pottery-Kohiki.jpg

    Razz: You asked an interesting question that I've been pondering about whether this makes me think differently. I'm certainly finding that it's pushing me to use different skills and attributes, and not necessarily the ones that are my areas of strength. I'm definitely more in my element with words and a bit so with numbers, with books and computer screens. I think that's a big part of what makes endeavors like woodworking and pottery so much fun. It's an entirely different realm of experience from how I have spent most of my life.
    The class meets Monday mornings, and I am always so grateful to be going to play in the clay studio instead of off to a series of meetings!

  7. #17
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    Very impressive, rr! I like the tray.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi
    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. HH Dalai Lama
    In a world where you can be anything - be kind. Unknown

  8. #18
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    Thanks for posting, those are lovely! I really like the wood grain effect.

  9. #19
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Lovely. I have made all my cookware and dishes on the wheel. I learned in college on a kick wheel. When my kids left for college years ago I started again. It takes a long time and a lot of upper body strength to throw on the wheel.

    I made a set of 18 dishes in three sizes and tons of bowls, baking dishes.

    what you may be experiencing is return to a nature connection. Gardening, working with natural materials like clay and wood and even chopping vegetables are all returning to our purpose I believe. Living in houses full of plastic, over processed food, bombardment with electronic devices and screens all day totally disconnects us from truly living and experiencing nature.

    I love the feel of the soil, the meditative effect of preparing and working with clay. Of making a stew full of vegetables and beans and grains and smelling it simmer. Even using the most natural bars of soap soothes the soul.

    I hope you enjoy the peace and joy of such an ancient art.

  10. #20
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Flowers: that is VERY impressive that you made all your dishes and cookware! I do think I may be hampered somewhat by my small stature and body weight, in addition to being left-handed, or perhaps I am just making excuses, lol. You might be interested in this amazing new tool. DH and I plan to try it out next time we go in to work independently in the studio.
    https://www.strongarmpotterytools.com/shop
    I am having a hard time mastering the centering of the clay, which is a critical initial step, and if you don't get this right, all subsequent efforts come out wonky. This makes the Strong Arm tool seem very appealing! But then, where do you draw the line between what is artisan made and what is machine made? Although in carpentry class we were certainly using power tools for a lot of steps that were once done by hand.

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