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Thread: Hurricane coming- people going nuts.

  1. #1
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Hurricane coming- people going nuts.

    Yesterday we were doing a few errands and decided to pick up a few groceries. Bread and water almost gone. Batteries and toilet paper dwindling fast.
    we know we live in the paths of hurricanes. I bet by tomorrow we will be in full frenzy. Usually grocery store and gas station deliveries are ramped up.
    thank goodness we are calm and at home and donít have to worry about running out of anything.

    the weathermen are in full frenzy. I think they live these moments when they can be hysterically and frantically practically screaming on tv.

    back to my knitting as I sit outside with my cats.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Where generally in FL are you?

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    That seems to be human nature--my friends in the Willamette Valley always laugh about people frantically stocking up ahead of weather events or grass fires, or epidemics. I'm stocked up and we rarely have events, so I have the luxury of not worrying about it.

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    No gas, and if there is gas the lines at the pump are multi cars deep.

    Frequently, when a storm approachs, the stores will put purchase limits on high demand items. So there's a limit of two cases of water per customer. I saw people grabbing four and husband and wife will check out separately. Now, I wonder if there were no limits if they'd just grab two and call it good.

    No peanut butter, soups, other canned goods. Hit or miss with milk. Only the non-standard bread. Didn't check the beer (was there for a regularly scheduled prescription pick up) but it often runs short at these times.

    With a state of emergency declared, I believe that prioritizes deliveries of demanded goods and so we should see gas and food stuffs back on shelves daily.

  5. #5
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    "Hmmm. Hurricane season's coming up--better lay in some staples and gas for the car..."
    Why don't people figure this out after a few years?

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    What about plywood, or do you have storm shutters?

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    Senior Member Klunick's Avatar
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    We have been through several hurricanes here in Maryland. Worst was Irene where the neighbor's tree took out 2 out of our 3 cars. Mine was spared but just barely. If the tree had been a tad taller, it would have gotten mine too. Electricity out for several weeks.

    Seems like whenever my inlaws are told to evacuate in Savannah, it misses them and smacks us. My brother in Ft Meyer's is probably going to get hit based on the current projection. It is always a "wait and see" type situation with hurricanes because they are forever changing paths from one day to the next.

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    I've done plywood in the past, but got panels years ago. It's much easier to store the panels as hubby made a cabinet to store them and they all stack together and stay nice. Plywood tends to degrade.

    Friends got hurricane windows and doors. The next door neighbor decided to kill himself in the garage with a propane explosion. The outer window layers were toast, and the front door actually blew in. Not encouraging as to the protection offered.

  9. #9
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    Where generally in FL are you?
    about 40 miles inland from Tampa. This far in it’s unlikely we will get a full force hit but the storm can always cause block roads, knock electricity out and cause lots of flooding. We were about 80% ready before this storm was on the radar and finished a few days ago.

  10. #10
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowerseverywhere View Post
    about 40 miles inland from Tampa. This far in it’s unlikely we will get a full force hit but the storm can always cause block roads, knock electricity out and cause lots of flooding. We were about 80% ready before this storm was on the radar and finished a few days ago.
    You never know how far inland those storms will travel. In 2008 my wife and I were travelling around the Gulf Coast and ended up in New Orleans a few days before Hurricane Ike. After seeing the sights for a day or two we were forced to evacuate once it began to look like it was going to impact the area, so we left town at 4am and after making a couple hundred miles from the coast we began to casually explore the Natchez Trace as we meandered towards home.
    Our first full day home, Ike caught up with us in Ohio, knocking down trees in our yard and damaging our roof, along with all our neighbors. That storm chased us over 800 miles before catching us.
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

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