Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 45

Thread: Do you believe you can "do what you love, and the money will follow?"

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,495

    Do you believe you can "do what you love, and the money will follow?"

    Years ago, I read Marsha Sinetar's book of that title. I also worked through a Barbara Sher book. For a while, I had a job I truly loved (newspaper reporter) but after some corporate changes, it went south, and so did my position. Since then I have been searching for something that will "work" for me.

    A friend of mine posted on Facebook today on my wall: basic to Buddhism is that based on past and present actions we create or own happiness and misery. Nobody has or will have the answers you are seeking. You have to trust in yourself. So, listen to your heart and follow what you truly want to be. You left or were unhappy with your past jobs for a reason and it is best not to repeat what was not satisfying in the past. Ask yourself why you were unhappy and make a list. Make a list of what makes you happy. List your skills. List what you want to learn or what you what to do or be and go for it. Then, success will follow.

    I have an interview this week for a job in a field I worked in before, and HATED for 13 years. But I'm running out of options.

    What do you think of what my friend said? Of Sinetar's book?

    Sorry if this is redundant--I'm sure it must have been discussed here before.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Sissy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    286
    It just happens that I am reading a book on Christian Buddhism and the title of your thread jumped out at me. I am all for following your muse. Mine certainly wouldn't pay the bills, tho. I am definately more artistic than practical. I work as a bookkeeper which makes me laugh every time I think about it. The job is not hard and I can definately handle it with ease, but, who knew??? I would rather write poetry, paint, decorate, write my calligraphy, but none of that would pay the bills because #1: I would have to move out of the boonies to do any of them successfully and, #2: I am not a risk taker. I really like to know what I am going to make, money wise, any given month.

    Oh, back to the book...... Without Buddha I Could not be a Christian by: Paul Knitter. This particular section is dealing with why bad things happen (tsunamis, death of a child, Sept. 11) and the Buddhist answer is basically; **** happens (as far as your losing your job). I certainly don't mean to trivialize your position, as it meant a lot to you and I am sorry you lost it.

    I am not sure that I agree with positive thinking to the extent that your friend posted. But success is certainly different for every person on the planet, and positive thinking is definately easier on us that negativity.

    I am becoming more of a realist because it allows for things to go either way without total devistation!

    I have seen book title that you mentioned many times and wondered about it, but never have read it. It sounds like something that I cannot bend my mind around as far as positive thinking goes. I am sure there is more to the book than that!

    I am sending good karma thoughts your way for a job that you can love and be proud of!!

    Sherry

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    Hmm. I think that it sometimes is easier to get going in a career that suits you and your talents, however I think in todays economy we can look at this in a broader sense. So I think that simply saying 'I love doing this' is not enough. I have several things I love to do, today i went hiking with my son and his science class, I have made a few potholders by crochet, I read a lot and I tried some mensa puzzles (apparently I am not a genius however scored 100% on the creativity test).

    I run after school for a school district covering 3 of the nearly 50 schools we have programs in. I worked summer camp as well. Maybe not using my creativity the way i originally thought however I really MUST use this creativity. Over summer camp I saw that we were using a lot of individual cereal boxes every day. The staff recycled them but I saw another use. I covered them in colored duct tape and created blocks (summer camp is paid by parents, the school year schools I have are grant based and always need materials). Along the way I found out that I really love training adults. Being part of training 250 staff for the school year was a blast. Yup, very introverted me did that because I love experiental education so much that I forgot to be nervous.

    Okay I wandered a bit, the point is to not look at 'what we love' in a limited sense. I can take traning and creativity in many directions. I can take the negotiation and mediation skills I have in many directions. And creativity can affect most all careers (maybe not accounting LOL). And in this current economy sometimes what we love is paying the bills and eatng. I wonder if there were monks who totally hated cultivating gardens or chopping wood and carrying water?

    BTW that book sounds awesome. I am Buddhist primarily but am easing my way back to the Christian side. I have not ever rejected Christianity but I know i will always have a Buddhist outlook.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Sissy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe Girl View Post
    . I wonder if there were monks who totally hated cultivating gardens or chopping wood and carrying water?
    lol, say what you want, but I am sure that some of them detested it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe Girl View Post
    BTW that book sounds awesome. I am Buddhist primarily but am easing my way back to the Christian side. I have not ever rejected Christianity but I know i will always have a Buddhist outlook.
    great to find a fellow traveler!
    Last edited by Sissy; 9-25-11 at 9:40pm. Reason: trying to figure out how to split a quote

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,495
    Sissy--I am going to check out that book. I thank you for your good wishes and opinion.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,495
    Zoe Girl, you have some good points there. I especially like that you discovered that you like training adults, something you discovered unexpectedly. We never know what we might enjoy doing until we do it. Or, the opposite: you might think "Oh, I'd love to do that (fill in the blank)" and then do it, and find you don't like it at all. I never thought I'd be able to run a sewing machine, after some disastrous results when I was 12. Well, in my 40s I learned sewing machines are not that scary, and can be fun to work with!

    I was raised Christian but am sort of pantheistic at this point, if that makes sense.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    7,907
    If doing what we love meant the money would follow every single would be rock star, actress, and screenwriter would have hit the big time. In reality of course it is not so.

    There are not possibly enough wonderful fulfilling jobs for everyone to do what they love (not in the current society at any rate). Someone has to work at Walmart, and gut our chickens, and harvest our fruit, and fry burgers (we don't have to patronize these places but as long as someone is), and pick up the trash, and work retail, and scrape plaque off our teeth, and collect bedpans and do the boring bean counter work and etc.. Heck there may not even be enough jobs for people to do what they don't love

    Now here's where the grain of truth comes in, if there is a career you like and a career you dislike and both have actual job opportunities, you will probably go a lot further and advance a lot farther in the career you like because you are working with your natural interests.

    Now whether to take any given job in unemployment, it depends entirely on how unhappy you are in unemployment. Sure I can imagine a few people having both the money and the confidence to hold out for a really nice opportunity even in this scary economy. I may have had the money but I lacked the confidence. I took a couple months off just thinking about my future, but eventually the uncertainty was getting to me and I settled, I settled big time with a bit of a commute and a pay and benefit cut from what I used to make even . But I can live on it decently anyway, and I know nothing is forever, and the uncertainty was getting to me, and most of the other offers I had were worse in various ways (I had real interest in me and quite a lot, but it was for pretty crummy positions mostly), and every day the paper would have some new bad news about the economy ..... Yea maybe I got scared of the economy hitting double dip, the unemployment rate hitting 15% (already 12% here) and still being unemployed. I guess sometimes I'm Scarlett O'Hara, never go hungry again!! Or in my case I was determined not to go down with the economy if there was anything I could do to help it (barring complete collapse of course in which case even those of us with jobs are probably screwed).
    Last edited by ApatheticNoMore; 9-26-11 at 1:47am.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    219
    In my book there are a million reasonable options between "I love" and "I hate".
    I enjoy my job but do not "love" it. Some tasks I would rather do not. But they belong to the job. So I get over it.
    I bet even an actor would rather not learn text or sit in front of the mirror being painted.

    At some people the "love what you do..." seems like a cheap excuse to chose the easy way (because that's what they love) and expect the world to provide a living for them.

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    10,584
    I think the best, most realistic answer to that question I've read was in the book by Jennifer White, Work Less, Make More. That book was one of the few life-changing books I've read in that it really did change my life. I had been wavering on the fence about quitting my job, which had gone from a job I loved to being a job I hated, and her book pushed me off the fence and I quit my job a week later.

    She explains how you have to find how to make your skills and desires marketable. It's not a matter of being a best-selling writer, it's how do you take your communications skills and do something with them that will actually make you money. She actually references the book Do What You Love, Money Will Follow and tells you how to put the right spin on it if you want to actually make money.

    In my case, the LAST job I thought I would love is the one I'm in. I had fancied myself a writer, an actress, a bunch of right brain jobs. I stumbled into market research, and lo and behold I USE my writing skills, I actually even use my acting skills, and other random skills that somehow come together in this field. And I make good money.

    So you can't be THAT literal about it. You have to be realistic, but at the same, I don't think we're meant to "hide our talent under a bushel." We're given our gifts for a reason.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    out in the sticks by Abilene, KS
    Posts
    268
    I have the Barbara Sher book. Is it 'The Artist's Way'? It's too early in the morning for me to remember...

    I do agree with the attitude of 'do what you love, etc.' and agree with Catherine on not being so literal. There's no promise of being ultra rich, but if you love what you're doing and make a living by doing it, does it matter? You may not be the artist that sells his canvases for millions, but you might be happy working a job in a creative field that allows you enough time off to paint, which is what you truly enjoy. Then that leads to more opportunities.

    One of the best lessons I learned was to change my thinking from 'I can't have this because____' to 'How can I have this'. Write it all down, considering beg, borrow, steal, rent. Then take the steps.

    Changing my thinking and acting on it allows me not to work a crappy job for a paycheck. I do live in the boonies, chop wood and cultivate my garden (it's a Zen-like thing for me). It's what I wanted. By living frugally I also have time to write, paint, whatever I want to do.

    My husband got what he wanted, a big, new house (3500 sq. ft) off an asphalt road, no further than 30 miles from a certain city or our kids, etc. Sure, the only way we could have all this was to build the house ourselves (using our skills), but we still live in an area that he wanted.

    Positive thinking brought him a job offer giving him more time at home, more time off with a job he enjoys (what he wanted). Less money than he was making before, but with our current lifestyle, we don't need nearly as much to live well (what I wanted).
    Marianne
    My lame blog: http://2atthefarm.blogspot.com/
    Eco Friendly Tightwaddery and the Fine Art of Substitution

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •