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Thread: Wealth Has A Positive Correlation With Depression

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    Senior Member Jemima's Avatar
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    Wealth Has A Positive Correlation With Depression

    I have suspected this for a long time, but here are the stats:

    http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=655161

    It seems the more money I have, the more stuff I get, and the more time I spend dealing with the stuff instead of enjoying my hobbies and my friends. Anyone else notice this?

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    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Nope.

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    Senior Member Jemima's Avatar
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    Thank you so much for your input.
    Last edited by Jemima; 2-20-12 at 2:21am.

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    Mrs-M
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    The statistics are interesting, and what you say related to having more money, means having more things (stuff), means investing more time looking after and paying attention to all those things, means less time to ones credit to enjoy life, etc, makes perfect sense to me.

    I surmise two main contingent factors are at play, the first being, most wealthy people are materialistic to the bone (through and through), placing all their energy and happiness on the dollar, and always wanting more, so when empires and fortunes turn to misfortunes, depression is sure to follow, whereas everyday average working class people tend to work towards a comfortable existence, a humble existence, investing their energy towards paying the basics off, possibly accumulating a modest nest egg if all goes well, then settling back and enjoying whatever simple and frugal livelihood their finances afford them.

    Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. Alexander Pope
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    Senior Member Jemima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs-M View Post
    The statistics are interesting, and what you say related to having more money, means having more things (stuff), means investing more time looking after and paying attention to all those things, means less time to ones credit to enjoy life, etc, makes perfect sense to me.

    I surmise two main contingent factors are at play, the first being, most wealthy people are materialistic to the bone (through and through), placing all their energy and happiness on the dollar, and always wanting more, so when empires and fortunes turn to misfortunes, depression is sure to follow, whereas everyday average working class people tend to work towards a comfortable existence, a humble existence, investing their energy towards paying the basics off, possibly accumulating a modest nest egg if all goes well, then settling back and enjoying whatever simple and frugal livelihood their finances afford them.

    Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed. Alexander Pope
    .
    Very good points, Mrs-M. The "More Disease", as Wayne Dyer has put it, seems to be rampant. I look around me and think "What a lot of STUFF!!!" And yet it's hard to refrain from online shopping.

    Our culture encourages more, more, more. I know I was able to be a lot more frugal when I volunteered at an emergency food pantry. Even though I was on a pittance of Worker's Comp, I felt rich compared to the clientele. They made do and some were even contented despite not having lots of STUFF. Contentment is such a blessing!

  6. #6
    Wildflower
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    Many people that have alot of money is because they are NOT materialistic....

    I know millionaires that are/were millionaires because they lived a very frugal and modest lifestyle. DH's parents and two of my cousins are three that come to mind immediately, among others. They contributed much to society and charities as well....

    Being materialistic and shopping too much has nothing to do with how much money one has in my opinion. I know people of all different income levels that manage their money well or not....

    I think this study is ridiculous. I'm sure the reason that more rich folks are diagnosed with depression is because they can afford to see a doctor in the first place, depressed poor people not so much. This study is laughable really....

    I remember being poor, so broke we couldn't pay the bills or eat for a period of time in my younger years - I recall very well being depressed!

    That being said, most depression is biochemical, not based on the size of the wallet.

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    Wildflower, count me in.

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    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildflower View Post
    Many people that have alot of money is because they are NOT materialistic....

    I know millionaires that are/were millionaires because they lived a very frugal and modest lifestyle. DH's parents and two of my cousins are three that come to mind immediately, among others. They contributed much to society and charities as well....

    Being materialistic and shopping too much has nothing to do with how much money one has in my opinion. I know people of all different income levels that manage their money well or not....

    I think this study is ridiculous. I'm sure the reason that more rich folks are diagnosed with depression is because they can afford to see a doctor in the first place, depressed poor people not so much. This study is laughable really....

    I remember being poor, so broke we couldn't pay the bills or eat for a period of time in my younger years - I recall very well being depressed!

    That being said, most depression is biochemical, not based on the size of the wallet.
    +1
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    Well, I'm not sure that I buy those results--not quite. I've read elsewhere that the most content people are those with enough money that they don't have to worry about meeting their basic necessities. And it's likely that those with wealth do have to spend more time taking care of their income and property--but that's expending time, not necessarily leading to depression.

    From my limited experience with monied folks, I'd say the happiest were those of old wealth, used to managing it and comfortable with it. Their lives were low-key and subtle with no need to flash symbols of their wealth about.

    The most unhappy and nervous seemed to be the nouveau rich who seemed not yet comfortable with their money and appeared rather desperate to hold on to it...and they went for the rather garish homes, chunky gold watches and status cars...

    The happiest people I know are those who are engaged in work they love and making a reasonable living from it--and included in this group are teachers, artists, writers, architects and others who are creating strong minds or objects of enduring beauty or value. Often, they've learned the value of "enough" and are content with a reasonable lifestyle--perhaps even a simple one.

    The unhappiest people I know are those who pursue money to all ends and never seem to get enough. They have some empty place in their psyches and souls that seems unfillable.

    Just my opinion and observations.
    Last edited by HappyHiker; 2-20-12 at 10:26am. Reason: typo
    peaceful, easy feeling

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    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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