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Thread: Mr. Money Mustache Forums

  1. #21
    Mrs-M
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    Originally posted by Weston.
    Not sure when things changed so drastically here, but my instincts tell me that they have in fact changed dramatically.
    Could you be a wee-bit more specific?

    I've been a SLN member for seven years (a dedicated member), and SLN has always been a very diverse site that has maintained an open and free policy encouraging all conversation, so I'm confused over your point made Re: the dramatic changes that have taken place.

    My personal take on sites that are geared towards acute regimented conversation, as in the case of MMM, where conversation revolves (solely) around frugality and money, money, money... is that they are boring. At least here it's free to voice your take on whatever matter you feel is worthy of starting or opening-up your day, and to me that says a lot about the diversity and enjoyment this site exudes.

  2. #22
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    I've actually been thinking about how this site has evolved over the last 10 years (versions 1.0 and 2.0) given this discussion and the one on reaching FI. I feel like part of the change is that in the early years many posters were aspiring/working toward simpler living, however they defined it, and now many are living it--with this community as sounding board, resource library and sometimes safe space for those of us whose real world communities are not supportive. Stella and her family's journey are an example that spring to mind. Whether that is because the members themselves have transitioned, or because we attract posters at different stages, I'm not sure.

    I enjoy visiting the MMM forums/blog--have taken away some good advice (need to get on re-evaluating what I pay for car insurance) and it's nice to see people being deliberate and responsible about their finances. I do find that after a little while I have had enough as they stick to a fairly narrowly focused set of topics. I also feel like the MMM approach is very effective for people who start with a certain set of resources (high professional incomes, early career stage) and want to follow the specific set of strategies offered up. However, at least in my browsing I do not seem to see many older people, people caring for elderly parents or children with health or special needs, people living in areas less conducive to MMM's strategies (for instance, he asks why anyone would have a landline....well, in my neighborhood, we get terrible cell-phone reception), or folks with income or physical limitations. Not that a lot of the advice isn't applicable across a lot of circumstances, but his strategies (which get reflected in the forums) definitely reflect his particular situation.

  3. #23
    Helper Gregg's Avatar
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    I think AmeliaJane is right, our membership has transitioned to a more mature (as in developed) set of members. There were a lot more 'characters' in the mix eight or ten years ago and a lot of the members who are now scaling back on working life were fully involved in that before. For example, I learned a whole lot about how to be an expat in Central America several years back. Enough, in fact, to learn that isn't what I really want to do, but that's where DW and I were in our thinking at the time. Ten years ago we had 3 kids at home and now two are married and the last one is a few months from heading off to college so my interests have evolved to where they are today. Changing venues also had a significant impact as several of the members from 1.0 didn't make the switch to here. Each had their own reason for not making the jump, but it did have a real impact on the community. Maybe we have become the comfortable old brown shoes of forums now, but I do think there are enough articulate and thoughtful members still active here to provide a lot of wisdom to newer members and to each other. There's a reason the old brown shoes are still one of my favorites.
    "Back when I was a young boy all my aunts and uncles would poke me in the ribs at weddings saying your next! Your next! They stopped doing all that crap when I started doing it to them... at funerals!"

  4. #24
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    I also feel like the MMM approach is very effective for people who start with a certain set of resources (high professional incomes, early career stage) and want to follow the specific set of strategies offered up.
    I have the impression and apprehension they might all out-earn me. I mean fine there are some rich people and high earners here, but it's pretty well balanced (ok it might trend a bit richer median here than the national average (which from news I read I get the impression is horrible!) but there's still some balance).

    However, at least in my browsing I do not seem to see many older people, people caring for elderly parents or children with health or special needs
    The older people here have given me a fear of the whole health insurance issue. OMG what is it going to be, I'll never afford it without working for the man. Issues that I probably wouldn't have thought about too much otherwise (although me paying near $300 a month for EMPLOYER PROVIDED insurance just to have a PPO is also rather absurd at this point!). Ok, that's not very positive

    I was never here for the wild and crazy alternative (I mean economically ) lifestyles days full of characters (actually more interesting to me than high earning professionallism, I tried for that, I got the incredible boredom of professional life, and never fully got the truly high earning part).
    I hope that someone saves a seat for me on the last plane out

  5. #25
    Mrs-M
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    Hey, Gregg, wouldn't it be great if we could transform the polished brown-shoe side of this forum into an all out black-shoe site? Taking it to a black-shoe level, IMO, would really help distinguish us from all the rest!

  6. #26
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    I like the MMM blog, but no interest in the forums. Been there, done that, don't need to spend more time on line. Now that I'm in my 50's, and having been very aware of my spending for at least the last 25 years, I am comfortable with where I am, and the decisions I've made, and don't really feel I need any "advice". I know there are areas where I spend more money than I absolutely have to, but most of that is my intentional choice, with the exception of health insurance which is a we-tell-you-what-coverage-you-must have plan since I live in Massachusetts.

  7. #27
    Mrs-M
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    Originally posted by AmeliaJane.
    Not that a lot of the advice isn't applicable across a lot of circumstances, but his strategies (which get reflected in the forums) definitely reflect his particular situation.
    Yeah... that's a huge put-off for me.

  8. #28
    Senior Member SimplyL's Avatar
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    I skimmed the MMM boards and have checked out others similar.. However, can say that I'm in a peaceful place in life. My internet time is for recreation, and I really don't find the 'fire and brimstone, you must do things x way or it's wrong' encouraging, useful, or motivating. However, that's for any board that I've been on, and there's something for everyone on the internet. I think that personal finance and simply living is subjective to the specific individual (or family's) needs, so following the model of one individual's case study (life experience) won't yield the same exact result. There's not a fit it all into one pretty box and tie a ribbon on it approach. Of course, there can be common ground good, sound advice of A) live below your means B) don't carry debt C) save. How people get to that place, well, there will be plenty of variables.

    I do enjoy his articles and his wife's input.. signed up to receive them in my inbox. They're thought provoking. My husband and I have our own unique situation and long term goals. And from the start, being active duty military, we're already in the minority (even if we fit into the 'middle class' income bracket).

    Some people do need that fire lit under them to become motivated. MMM can do it. Dave Ramsey can do it.. Scorched earth, Gazelle mode, MMM badassity. However, after 3 years, we've evolved and don't feel like we need to follow any one person's advice (that is especially not military), to get our end result.

    Anyhow, with this board, I get the impression that folks are settled, comfortable with what they're doing (on whatever end of the spectrum of simple living they are on), and are confident. That's just more my speed. I was primarily looking for something more geared towards simple living with some finance convos sprinkled in, too. (Just input from a new member)
    Reduce the complexities of life by eliminating the needless wants of life, and the labors of life reduce themselves. - Edwin Way Teale





  9. #29
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    My internet time is for recreation, and I really don't find the 'fire and brimstone, you must do things x way or it's wrong' encouraging, useful, or motivating.
    oh it's plenty motivating - of rebellion
    I hope that someone saves a seat for me on the last plane out

  10. #30
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    I find the MMM site has some interesting ideas on the low expense side of things and not buying a lot of consumer junk. He has great points on that front.

    He loses me on the how much money do you need to retire front. 4% withdrawal rate at age 38? 7% return? Not accounting for inflation? No medical or dental expenses in the budget or accounting for rapidly increasing health insurance premiums / costs later in life? There is much more realistic advice on the early-retirement.org forums on the financial planning side of FI.

    I just get the feeling people want hope about FI more than financial accuracy, so sites that have realistic numbers on what it really takes to retire in your 30s, even with frugal living, will never be massively popular.
    Last edited by try2bfrugal; 10-22-12 at 6:21pm.

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