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Thread: Hiking Barefoot

  1. #11
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    Wow, thanks for all the info, Zoebird. I'd read somewhere before that shoes alter the natural gait. I always had problems with shoes as a kid. My Mom would try to buy orthopedic shoes for me because, as she would tell the shoe salespeople, "She walks funny".

    I scoped out a local trail today, and I think I can manage most of it barefoot. I'll take my water shoes with me for the parts with small rocks. I have to wear closed-toe shoes for part of my job (lab and greenhouse), but other than that, I think I'll be using my sandals or flip-flops the rest of the summer.

  2. #12
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    for work, a lot of people use moccasins or the vibrams (if you don't need metal toed shoes for safety reasons).

    i wear my vibrams with just about everything (today, a dress over my yoga clothes which are ankle-length yoga pants and tank top, then the dress over, and when i get to the office, i take them off (since it's a yoga studio and I can do that.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I have a pair of vibram five fingers and have done a lot of hiking and short runs in them. I'm a slightly old geezer with some assorted knee and foot problems. I believe the five fingers had some positive therapeutic value for those. One of my hiking trails has some medium sized pointy rocks and last summer I bruised the bottom of my foot. It wasn't serious, but took a long time to heal and I had to go back to regular shoes. So I'm pretty selective about where I wear them now. That aside, not only did it seem to help a few things, but it was actually fun. I'd think you would have to have built up some pretty good calluses to have protection against sharp objects to go totally barefoot.

    So I'm a believer in the theory, but in practice there are some risks to watch out for.

  4. #14
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    Thanks, Rogar. I may give the vibrams a try. I agree about being cautious where to use them. A few years ago I hiked a trail at Pine Mountain, GA, that seemed to be carpeted with small, irregular rocks. I could feel them even through my tennis shoes - it was pretty uncomfortable. I'd keep my boots for trails like that.

  5. #15
    Senior Member ctg492's Avatar
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    How do you get your feet really clean looking , all you barefoot people? Or am I the only barefooter that has feet that look like an Amish lady?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctg492 View Post
    How do you get your feet really clean looking , all you barefoot people? Or am I the only barefooter that has feet that look like an Amish lady?
    I can accept that my feet look like crap I've never been a pedicure kind of girl anyway.

  7. #17
    bunnys
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    But what do you do if you work on a cement slab? I am a teacher and so I walk around all day on a cement slab. When I wear shoes with no support, I feel it.

    Also, I take a LONG hike every day. The hike is rocky and packed dirt. I would love to try hiking barefoot (I have seen some broken glass, though) but am afraid my feet would get tired and I wouldn't be able to finish--miles from my car.

  8. #18
    Wildflower
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    Love going barefoot. Never put on shoes unless I have to. Don't think I would hike barefoot, but I'm not doing much hiking these days anyway thanks to my back problems.

  9. #19
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    I'd be a little worrried just hiking barefoot - I think it's something your feet grow into over time. I haven't done it since I was a teenager (footwear was something you had to wear to be allowed inside of public buildings), but your feet toughen up.

    Now I just wear Converse Allstars or sandals most of the time, which feel more like walking on a rubber mat than wearing shoes.

  10. #20
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    Running barefoot is a real craze now - and was in the past. I haven't tried it and don't intend to. But you can buy expensive running shoes that are suppose to be just like running barefoot but with a bit of support. I do long distance trail running on pretty rough terrain and can't imagine NOT wesring trail running shoes for both support and traction. Stubbed toes on rocks and roots? No Thanks!

    Would you pay $200 for these? Nope!!

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