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Thread: Lucas' journal: a minimalist mission

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    I like estate sales, so I had a different reaction. I thought some of the rugs were really pretty, and I liked some of the Indian jewelry.
    No, I would not want to live with this much stuff but it looks like it made them happy. Don't see the why the need to judge them harshly--it's not hoarderville, dirty with rats crawling on it.

    My collection of wooden handled screwdrivers would probably strike many here as superfluous. But I like them, they are useful, and to me, they are pretty and a reminder of an older time.
    I like estate sales, too. I usually just walk around and look - rarely buy. And I agree with you, if it made them happy - wonderful. I can't help but think, however, after death, how fair is it to leave it all for someone else to deal with. I say enjoy your stuff while your here, but also deal with it and/or make arrangements to have it dealt with before you are gone. Example would be my dh and his HUGE collection of baseball stuff. He has already been told that none of the kids want any of it, and I don't want any of it. If he wants to donate things to museums or other people, he might want to start making those arrangements now.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  2. #62
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    That makes sense. But maybe they already had the conversation, and this is how it's done in their family. I went to an estate sale this weekend (bought a book on American architecture and another Christmas tree pin to repair, talk about useless; husband bought two rare hammer heads) and someone tried to buy the house, and the estate sale lady said, no, the heir was coming to live in it. So he puts on the sale, keeps what he wants (a few really nice pieces were marked no sale) and the place is cleaned out when he gets there, he gets to live in his mom's house all cleaned out and tidy, and he also gets a check. She was 94 and looked like she lived there to the end.

    He lived far away, in New Mexico. Seems like a good deal to him.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    That makes sense. But maybe they already had the conversation, and this is how it's done in their family. I went to an estate sale this weekend (bought a book on American architecture and another Christmas tree pin to repair, talk about useless; husband bought two rare hammer heads) and someone tried to buy the house, and the estate sale lady said, no, the heir was coming to live in it. So he puts on the sale, keeps what he wants (a few really nice pieces were marked no sale) and the place is cleaned out when he gets there, he gets to live in his mom's house all cleaned out and tidy, and he also gets a check. She was 94 and looked like she lived there to the end.

    He lived far away, in New Mexico. Seems like a good deal to him.
    Exactly! Sounds like it worked all around.
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  4. #64
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Wow the amount of stuff is overwhelming. I loved estate sales when young and we needed things. I also don’t go to garage sales with my husband because we don’t need a thing and he will buy things. He doesn’t go without me luckily.

  5. #65
    Senior Member KayLR's Avatar
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    Wow, they must have had a huge home, lots of china cabinets! Think of the dusting! I love estate sales, too, just to see things I've never seen before. And to appreciate the way things used to be made. You know: well.
    My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&Ms and a chocolate cake. I feel better already!

  6. #66
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I like estate sales but I’ve seen so much stuff exactly like this Dallas house has over the years that I tire of it, only St. Louis estate sales have a few hundred items not thousands of items.

    We all have our collections. This house had tons of collections. Sure if they got pleasure out of it so what, is just that I prefer to see elevated taste. But that’s very Dallas. And sorry, I call it hoarding but the label doesn’t really matter. their collection of stuff doesn’t hurt anyone and certainly has enriched whomever sells it to them so all is well unless they thought they would finance their grandchildren’s trust with the stuff. That won’t happen because this is exactly the kind of stuff that no one buys anymore, it is dated.

  7. #67
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    I have no collection of anything since getting rid of the ones I had.

  8. #68
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    The idea that selling the collections creates a burden for the heirs is just silly. They stand to inherit hundreds of thousands of dollars, in most cases, from the sale of the house and its contents. It won't kill them to earn a little of it.

  9. #69
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    The idea that selling the collections creates a burden for the heirs is just silly. They stand to inherit hundreds of thousands of dollars, in most cases, from the sale of the house and its contents. It won't kill them to earn a little of it.
    Well, were it me, I would have 0 interest in “Earning a little” of the presumed money by exchanging my life energy for it. This is one of the basic lessons in Your Money or Your Life money or Your Life, personified by a house full of tons of stuff.

    Now, In real life, I would just hire someone to get rid of it all, and send me a check when it is gone. If that means I pay them 50% Or 75% of the proceeds, so be it. though in real life, I would have a sibling (or in my case a sister-in-law,) who wants to fuss with every tiny thing, touching and caressing and holding their own garage sales and dear God it will go on and on and on. With that Dallas house I think we might be done in eight years and nine months. So worth it!


    Not.

  10. #70
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    I would sell it myself over 3 days and donate the rest. I have done it many times for friends and family.

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