Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: Is Comcast taking over the world?

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,149
    Google currently, directly competes with Time Warner, but I am not sure about Comcast (not sure all the boundaries) locally/regionally. Also Google does have a business relationship with Comcast (its search provider). The last thing that wasn't search, that I knew Yahoo competed against, was Ebay, back when Yahoo had an auction section.
    I wish I had seen what Steve saw. I find that argument interested, since just a few years ago, Comcast and Time Warner swapped some service area's.

  2. #12
    Helper Gregg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Macondo (or is that my condo?)
    Posts
    3,508
    Quote Originally Posted by onlinemoniker View Post
    I don't think so on the "tier" and "package" deals. Usually monopolistic industry means less choice for the consumer, not more. That idea sounds lot like a la carte pricing which I would have loved to have seen when I was their cable customer. But as they were the only cable provider in town they were not inclined to offer customers the choice to purchase less of their product.
    I don't think ala carte would be a trend regardless of how ownership shakes out. ESPN costs ~$5 per subscriber per month whether you watch it or not. Its welfare for sports junkies. Move to ala carte and the 10 million true fans would have to ante up without the subsidy from the other 190 million of us that couldn't care less. (BTW, these accurate statistics were completely made up.)

    We cut the cord last year and, except for the occasional cooking show, haven't looked back. What I need is a way to cut the internet cord and, at the same time, get gigabit speed for free. Dare to dream.
    "Back when I was a young boy all my aunts and uncles would poke me in the ribs at weddings saying your next! Your next! They stopped doing all that crap when I started doing it to them... at funerals!"

  3. #13
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,764
    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    I wish I had seen what Steve saw. I find that argument interested, since just a few years ago, Comcast and Time Warner swapped some service area's.
    Here's a link (comments pro and con; I tried to choose a neutral source) explaining market shares and some of Comcast's comments. Since I wrote my last response, I did learn that Comcast's ownership of NBC has put some additional restrictions on them to preserve network neutrality. But IMHO that only slightly mitigates the negatives.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  4. #14
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    2,764
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg View Post
    What I need is a way to cut the internet cord
    I believe that's the elephant in the room in this deal. The cable companies have become almost more essential for providing broadband Internet access than they are for providing round-the-clock TV. For us, cutting out cable would save us a whopping $9 a month off a $65 bill. It's a nothingburger.

    Internet access has become a utility, much like gas & electric. Yet the oversight applied to broadband access is minimal despite providers enjoying a geographic monopoly. And the costs of entry (e.g., a Google buildout of fiber to cover even a fraction of the customers covered by Comcast/Time Warner) are daunting. Really, Internet service should be treated like other public utilities. It's yet another instance (like HD TV standards and mobile-phone transmission standards) in which the U. S. let private companies lead the market, and it has resulted in a balkanized and expensive market for consumers.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •