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Thread: Living Without a Cell Phone

  1. #11
    Senior Member larknm's Avatar
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    DH and I have never had a cellphone. Our landline is sufficient, no problem.
    I think deep in our hearts we know that our comforts, our conveniences are at the expense of other people. Grace Lee Boggs

  2. #12
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I wouldn't not have a cell phone; they're cheap insurance and a lot more convenient (not to mention sanitary) than the soon-to-be-extinct pay phone. I may not ever have a smart phone, but I may update my pay-as-you-go flip phone for one with a camera.
    Last edited by JaneV2.0; 12-7-14 at 8:26pm.

  3. #13
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Jane: Our $30. Tracfone has a camera, believe it or not.

  4. #14
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Rosarugosa--perfect!

  5. #15
    Senior Member kib's Avatar
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    I have actually come to the conclusion that my cell phone is one of my most valued possessions. Ok, not as priceless as the two darling pudge balls who insist on sharing my chair, providing so much hum it's like getting a massage, but nevertheless, very high on the list of practical appliances.

    I know a lot of people complain of "phone zombies". I'm not into the whole constant interaction mode of phones, the selfie generation, but I don't see even that as evil, it's just a different way of communicating - and expressing oneself - to other real people who aren't in the room. For me, this device just takes the place of two dozen items no one ever complained about, and i don't see the problem. It's my solitaire deck. it's my library book, my magazine, my newspaper. it's my tv and my vcr. it's my camera and my photo album. it's my address book. it's my sears catalog. it's my calendar. it's my dictionary, my encyclopedia and my research textbook. it's my alarm clock, it's my watch. It's my walkman, it's my transistor radio, it's my record collection. it's even my flashlight. And, oh yeah, it replaces a large box of landline phone equipment and a collection of payphones. So what?? Frankly, as an environmentalist, I think that even though it's a resource beast, it's a lot less of one than the mountain of manufactured goods it replaces. It also makes it possible for me to have all that "Stuff" with me anywhere.

    Clue for the clickbait: different font (and not one that enhances the reading experience). This was probably cut and pasted with a few edits for our tastes.
    Last edited by kib; 12-8-14 at 1:29pm.

  6. #16
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I'm still amazed that such a tiny instrument contains such a wealth of functions. I would add voice recorder, GPS, language tutor. and translator. I finally got around to adding Wi-Fi (only bought the gear a year or so ago), so now I can play around with a tablet. Ich bin eine Frau!

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    I wouldn't not have a cell phone; they're cheap insurance and a lot more convenient (not to mention sanitary) than the soon-to-be-extinct pay phone. I may not ever have a smart phone, but I may update my pay-as-you-go flip phone for one with a camera.
    On the soon to be extinct part, that may depend on local laws. In Missouri, if you have a 24 hour gas station, that isn't manned 24 hours (people can pay with cc/dc at night), it must have an emergency shut off, and a working pay phone for emergency notification. (a fire at the station)
    Inside of a mall is the only other place I know of a couple of pay phones, otherwise.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Selah's Avatar
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    I really enjoy having a smartphone. Would the original poster be as outraged if people were glued to paperback books while standing in line, as I used to be? Now I can just use my e-reader on my phone to read the same books and articles. Or if loving couples left notes for each other to enjoy reading while in another part of the house? Of course, people are slowly developing their own sense of phone use etiquette when in social situations, but that will come in time. One thing my phone can do for me is to give me voice-guided driving instructions and, even if I mess up and miss a turn, can get me back on track. This has saved me enormous amounts of time, money, stress, and opportunities I might have missed had I not been able to arrive on time. My car has also broken down in the past, and it's far safer and more convenient to call the towing service from the car, than to risk walking along the highway in 20F-degree Michigan weather in the middle of the night, hoping to find an exit ramp with an open truck stop, as I did in my college years.

  9. #19
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    Maybe it's a question of whether we own the technology -- or the technology owns us. Many use tech wisely, some don't and are rather addicted.

    Me, I live a life where a cell phone/samrt phone is not necessary...had one, never used it.

    Now DH and I now share a Trac phone which we take along when traveling mostly. Comes in handy sometimes.

    I know some who cannot be without some electronic device in their hands at all times and their minds are elsewhere. Kind of sad, little human interaction.
    peaceful, easy feeling

  10. #20
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HappyHiker View Post
    ...
    I know some who cannot be without some electronic device in their hands at all times and their minds are elsewhere. Kind of sad, little human interaction.
    I imagine most of the people you see are interacting with another party at the other end of their phone; there's a whole lot of texting going on out there.

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