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Thread: 3 D Housing? Anyone seen these?

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    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    3 D Housing? Anyone seen these?

    While I had heard of 3D products, I thought that 3D Housing would be more in the future. Apparently, it is now https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...CMP=GTUK_email.

    "The company’s printers have the capacity to make a 350-sq-ft home in less than 24 hours, said Sam Ruben, the co-founder and chief sustainability officer of Mighty, during a recent tour of the headquarters. Often the printers are set to build a house overnight, while the employees are asleep.

    “We are actually limited more by road transport of the buildings than the actual ability to print,” Ruben said.

    The Rancho Mirage homes will each feature mid-century modern architecture and consist of a three-bedroom, two-bath primary residence of 1,450 sq ft, along with a secondary residence on the property of two bedrooms and one bath.

    Each home’s 10,000-sq-ft lot will have a swimming pool in the back yard and the option to pay extra for amenities such as cabanas, hot tubs, fire pits and outdoor showers. Prices will start at $595,000 for a base 3BR/2BA model and go up to $950,000 for a two-home configuration with upgrades...

    Rancho Mirage is not the first place to see 3D-printed homes in recent years. In 2019 a non-profit in Mexico announced the production of 3D-printed homes for low-income families. Meanwhile, 3D-printed homes are scheduled to be installed in Austin, Texas, later this year.

    The rise of 3D-printed homes comes as California’s housing crisis continues to rage. The state needs between 1.8m and 3.5m new housing units by 2025 to address the shortage and accommodate projected population growth. In February, Mighty Buildings secured $40m in series B funding."
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Just recently I ran across the concept of 3-D printed homes and yeah. I don’t get it. I would have to watch a video presentation about what this really means for me to get it.

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    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
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    That's really expensive.

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    The mean price of a house in Rancho Mirage is about $600K.

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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    I've seen the video and it's largely a computer-controlled robot crew squeezing concrete out of a tube according to the directions (corner here, window cutout starts here, etc.). It is entertaining to watch.

    It would be nice if that concept could have been applied to homes more people could buy. $600K may be a deal in California, but it gets you a 90th percentile house here in Minnesota (100% almost anyplace outstate that's not on a big lake). Then again, all the furniture Ray and Charles Eames put together out of fiberglass and plywood was originally intended to be "people's furniture" yet dining room chairs they designed go for several hundreds of dollars and the Mid-Century Modern classic Eames Lounge Chair goes for a cool six grand even after decades of production.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

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    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    I imagine that the price is as high as it is because of the cost of the 10,000 sq foot lot that the house sits on.

    Edited to add: After a very cursory look on realtor.com it appears that similar sized vacant lots in Rancho Mirage cost from $300k on up.

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    Looks like a fad to me. The key phrase is "We are actually limited more by road transport of the buildings than the actual ability to print," This will never be practical as long as they have to print the house sections in a factory and transport them to the building site. When/if they reach a point where they can set up the printer on the building site and quickly move it from lot to lot as each house is completed, then this technology may have potential. Until then it would make more sense to print individual interchangeable wall sections and other easily transportable components.

    As historical reference, I'll point out that for decades it's been totally possible to build a complete bathroom in a factory and transport it on a flatbed truck, but do you ever see that being done?

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Frank Loyd Wright designed concrete block homes in Los Angeles intended to be affordable. I suppose this is similar
    ideology.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Frank Loyd Wright designed concrete block homes in Los Angeles intended to be affordable. I suppose this is similar
    ideology.
    Trust me, dear lady, you do not want to know my opinion of Frank Lloyd Wright! Beginning with the fact that every house he designed included the furniture he wanted it to have in it, and after it was completed and occupied he would drop in for a visit now and then during which if there was a plant of a piece of furniture out of place, he would return it to the spot he intended it to be!

    And BTW: HIs concrete block houses were definitely not intended to be affordable.

    List of those houses: The Alice Millard House, also known as La Miniatura, was Frank Lloyd Wright’s first textile block house. The Millard house is one of five concrete block homes constructed by Wright in Southern California — others include the Hollyhock House, the Freeman House, the John Storer House, and the Ennis House.

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeParker View Post
    Trust me, dear lady, you do not want to know my opinion of Frank Lloyd Wright! Beginning with the fact that every house he designed included the furniture he wanted it to have in it, and after it was completed and occupied he would drop in for a visit now and then during which if there was a plant of a piece of furniture out of place, he would return it to the spot he intended it to be!

    And BTW: HIs concrete block houses were definitely not intended to be affordable.

    List of those houses: The Alice Millard House, also known as La Miniatura, was Frank Lloyd Wright’s first textile block house. The Millard house is one of five concrete block homes constructed by Wright in Southern California — others include the Hollyhock House, the Freeman House, the John Storer House, and the Ennis House.
    Wright’s American System- Built system houses were created in his plan for affordable houses. Yes, he was interested in, and contributed to affordable housing. At least he had affordability as a goal. Whether or not these structures were actually affordable is not my point.

    His Usonian homes were intended to be affordable, simple, houses for the middle class. Those are the block ones I am thinking of.

    I’m pretty well acquainted with a Usonian style Wright houses because I went on a house tour last summer to a .Usonian Wright house and and sat for a couple hours having drinks drinks in the living room where all original furniture still existed. Even original Upholstery was there. It all was a little shabby. Many ceiling leaks.

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