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Thread: Easter dinner choices?

  1. #11
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    It looks like this will be the first major holiday since DW's sister passed away last fall that almost all the family will be together, so we're looking forward to it. I think almost all of us have had at least one shot of vaccine except for DD and her family (hosting). Potluck brunch, with a couple of egg bakes, deviled eggs, a French-toast bake, deviled eggs, bacon-wrapped cocktail wienies, a nice spring-y salad, and deviled eggs. I have never seen a family swoop into deviled eggs as quickly as this family does. But since I'm among those swooping in (a relatively safe bet for a low-carber), I can't say much. You bring deviled eggs, you bring home an empty tray. Win-win, eh? Unless there's ham in one of the egg bakes, it won't make an appearance at the table.

    Those who want to go to church will attend before brunch. We will have an Easter egg hunt for the three toddlers. I hope there are lots of laughs and good memories created. It should be in the 70s on Easter, so that should be nice, too. It will be nice to get back to kind-of-normal.
    Wow, the seventies this early in your neck of the woods should really help make for a memorable day!

  2. #12
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    It is funny how devilled eggs come into fashion and disappear at potlucks and then a few years later, there are few at potlucks. I am not a fan of devilled eggs. I think I saw too many with way too much mayo added and made them too sloppy. I remember some with finely diced ham added and they were very good.
    Thinking about it, I don't like egg salad sandwiches for the same reason, too sloppy.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  3. #13
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    We are having and Easter Egg Hunt for the kids of the town. The Savannah NY Chamber of Commerce is putting it on. Should be a good couple of hours. Sending the kids on the field with just their own family to keep in regulations for covid. Fun Covid. Not.....
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  4. #14
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    It is funny how devilled eggs come into fashion and disappear at potlucks and then a few years later, there are few at potlucks.
    For whatever reason, they've been popular at potlucks here for decades (not just DW's family). Then again, we're in the Midwest; we don't always do the fashionable thing. lol
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    Do you plan on 'hot cross buns'?
    Wouldn't hot cross buns be a rather ironic and unfortunate choice, given the reason we observe Easter?

  6. #16
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Any sweet, yeasted bread with dried fruit and spices abound at Easter—my aunt makes Polish babka—and on Good Friday, in particular. Nobody knows exactly where the first hot cross bun was ‘invented,’ but the Christians might have continued an earlier practice from the Jewish tradition of challah bread. In the United States, we continued this English tradition,” says Beth Forrest, Ph.D., a food historian and professor of liberal arts and food studies at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York.

    The history of hot cross buns is a bit fuzzy, but they likely date back to the Middle Ages when it was a cultural institution to share sweet sacrifices with the gods. Many believe that monks first developed hot cross buns in the 1300s, then distributed them to feed the poor. In the late 1500s, when many English citizens believed the buns had magical or healing powers, Queen Elizabeth I began restricting their sale to only Good Friday, Christmas, and at funerals so the magic wouldn’t be abused. That’s when many home bakers began whipping up their own hot cross buns...

    “Hot cross buns have Catholic roots,” Hopwood says. “Primarily because of the use of dairy, hot cross buns were often forbidden during Lenten periods—when Catholics would instead eat non-dairy breads. The shape of the cross, of course, also represents Catholic imagery of the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.”

    The spices in the bread dough are said to represent the spices used to embalm Jesus before he was buried (and rose again, just like the buns).
    Source:https://www.bhg.com/holidays/easter/...uns-at-easter/

    While baking them last night, I was curious about the history of these buns.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  7. #17
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    The historical connection of hot cross buns to Easter is clear enough, but I still think it's ironic that people would eat sweet spicy bread decorated with an X on Good Friday. Unleavened bread or bitter herbs I would understand, but hot cross buns make no sense to me. Otoh they weren't part of my family's traditions, or anyone else that I knew.

  8. #18
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    For whatever reason, they've been popular at potlucks here for decades (not just DW's family). Then again, we're in the Midwest; we don't always do the fashionable thing. lol
    Deviled eggs are always a popular potluck item to bring. I like to bring them because they are super cheap. Once you have equipment to haul them around, and you need one of those deviled egg holders, the rest of it’s easy.

  9. #19
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    Only some in the household celebrate. Not doing the "baskets" or egg decorating - everyone is too old. Not sure about dinner either. We'll see how the weekend unfolds.
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  10. #20
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I recently learned about the giant egg festival in Iran. Who would have thought?!!!?

    https://en.isna.ir/photo/97122412718...ival-in-Tehran


    1B073CC1-2B51-41D6-9969-37446DD1AC67.jpg

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