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Thread: Why don't we live together?

  1. #31
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Perhaps unfairly, I look askance at the "crunchy granola" stereotype that co-housers have.

    it.
    yes...you said it in a few words, I took paragraphs to say it.

    people who like people are not my kind of people and I do not want to live with them!

  2. #32
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    yes...you said it in a few words, I took paragraphs to say it.

    people who like people are not my kind of people and I do not want to live with them!
    That's why I chose editing; if I were paid by the word, I'd starve to death.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Perhaps unfairly, I look askance at the "crunchy granola" stereotype that co-housers have.

    In defense of suburbs, I've lived in two that were pretty walkable, though Bellevue is more likely classed an edge city. One of the many advantages they have is that one can be as private as one desires. You have to be intrepid to walk here (the town center is a mile or more away)--outside of "walking to nowhere," as my friend describes it.
    I agree on both counts. I wouldn’t want any portion of my life determined by a committee of later day hippies seeking affiliation and status.

    I also like a nice suburban neighborhood and have no problem with newer, plainer housing. I wouldn’t want to wear my grandfather’s clothes, and see no attraction to living in my grandfather’s house. But I’m just a philistine about stuff like that.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I don't mind so much the crunchy granola stereotype as long as it doesn't get too touchy feely hippie dippy. Community drum ceremonies are probably a bad sign. I would mind the exclusion of the other diverse groups that make life interesting. Sort of the same reason I object to gated communities.

  5. #35
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I don't mind so much the crunchy granola stereotype as long as it doesn't get too touchy feely hippie dippy. Community drum ceremonies are probably a bad sign. I would mind the exclusion of the other diverse groups that make life interesting. Sort of the same reason I object to gated communities.
    We like to make fun of the planned community “New Town” out in the suburban hinterlands. They build faux Victorians. They actually used as their initial advertising image, and this is God’s Truth, a photo of my neighborhood to advertise their planned community before they actually had anything built.

    My first view of New Town was a surreal experience. Here on the horizon were Victorian looking structures rising out of the Prairie. Wtf is that!

    There it’s not cohousing of course. It is an attempt to build something walkable, a nice place without all of the inconveniences of urban living because well, they don’t have that urban population.

  6. #36
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I don't mind so much the crunchy granola stereotype as long as it doesn't get too touchy feely hippie dippy. Community drum ceremonies are probably a bad sign. I would mind the exclusion of the other diverse groups that make life interesting. Sort of the same reason I object to gated communities.
    I imagine crunchy granola people to welcome diversity. Of course it is only diversity that can afford to buy into that planned community at $482,000. Or whatever the high buyin fee is. That right there eliminates most undesirable elements of “diversity. “Unless they have section 8 residents. Ha ha Ha. Ha Hah Hah Hah Hah Hah Hah. Yeah, would like to see that happen.

  7. #37
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I agree on both counts. I wouldn’t want any portion of my life determined by a committee of later day hippies seeking affiliation and status.

    I also like a nice suburban neighborhood and have no problem with newer, plainer housing. I wouldn’t want to wear my grandfather’s clothes, and see no attraction to living in my grandfather’s house. But I’m just a philistine about stuff like that.
    Be careful, if you live long enough your standard house well may become an object worth preservation fervor.

    1960’s ranches are all the rage and I am watching the trend to see when 1970s splits take over as the coolest thing to preserve.

    Me, I draw the line at 1970. I will not live in anything built after 1970. Unless in my fantasy it would be something that I have built and then it would have high ceilings and nice millwork and etc.

  8. #38
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    IL, the planned community you describe sounds like Habersham in Beaufort--basically it's faux Charleston on a marsh.

    https://habershamsc.com/

  9. #39
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Bae's idea would be good but I need an extensive walkable community, ready access to commercial suppliers of groceries, personal services, etc. There is something to the idea of one's tribe but I need diversity of ages, etc. The Villages in Florida seems to be a success for a large population but would that be considered co-housing? What makes it work?
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  10. #40
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    IL, the planned community you describe sounds like Habersham in Beaufort--basically it's faux Charleston on a marsh.

    https://habershamsc.com/
    That does sound like a lovely spot.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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