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Thread: Why don't we live together?

  1. #41
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    I don't mind crunchy granola really, I like counter-cultural. And hippies seeking status is an oxymoron. It's people trying to climb the corporate ladder or buy a fancy car or look a certain way that seek status, ie way more mainstream people. And anyone who thinks hippies have ever been mainstream anytime after the 60s (and I was born well after that), yea give me a break. Maybe counter-cultural types seek belonging and I suppose any belonging has elements of status seeking, but shrug the suburban homeowners might seek to have the nicest garden on the block. Human beings do human things. The truth is the ONLY people that I feel "this is my tribe" with have been counter-cultural.

    But the honest truth is I go through periods of depression and desire for hermitage where I really really don't want to see others. But if I'm doing better, I do. I suppose being a loner hermit is counter-cultural too, but I really don't care what it is, I honestly get sick of humanity sometimes. But yea when young I fantasized like crazy about joining a commune.

    I initially though this was a thread about why couples don't live together and well yea now that would indeed be a fight about things being messy etc..
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I imagine crunchy granola people to welcome diversity. Of course it is only diversity that can afford to buy into that planned community at $482,000. Or whatever the high buyin fee is. That right there eliminates most undesirable elements of “diversity. “Unless they have section 8 residents. Ha ha Ha. Ha Hah Hah Hah Hah Hah Hah. Yeah, would like to see that happen.
    The average home price in the Denver metro area is about $500K. Mostly neither here nor there, but beyond my comprehension and my middle class 50's neighborhood is no where near average but getting there. Makes $482 seem reasonable.

    I think I'd go crunchy granola over snooty rich or white gentrification, assuming they don't overlap. Or heaven forbid a bunch of Republicans like Colorado Springs, which has been rated one of the most conservative cities in the nation. It's never perfect and would be a better place if everyone was like me (ha ha).

    Edit to add: Crunchy over red necks, too.

  3. #43
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    The average home price in the Denver metro area is about $500K. Mostly neither here nor there, but beyond my comprehension and my middle class 50's neighborhood is no where near average but getting there. Makes $482 seem reasonable.

    I think I'd go crunchy granola over snooty rich or white gentrification, assuming they don't overlap. Or heaven forbid a bunch of Republicans like Colorado Springs, which has been rated one of the most conservative cities in the nation. It's never perfect and would be a better place if everyone was like me (ha ha).
    omg the day .i pay $482,000 to live with a bunch of touchy feely wackos is the day you will KNOW I am out of my head.

    Here, $482,000 is a ridiculous sum. The most I will pay for a house is $350,000, and that would be under duress.
    And in another state like NH.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Be careful, if you live long enough your standard house well may become an object worth preservation fervor.

    1960ís ranches are all the rage and I am watching the trend to see when 1970s splits take over as the coolest thing to preserve.

    Me, I draw the line at 1970. I will not live in anything built after 1970. Unless in my fantasy it would be something that I have built and then it would have high ceilings and nice millwork and etc.
    Youíre probably right. I wish I had held on to some of my old lunch boxes and comic books. And my Microsoft stock. And my Pinto. Maybe someday the HGTV mavens will be pushing Earth tones and built in fondue pots.

  5. #45
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I have a couple of crunchy relatives but I don't think they're into communal living--and I'm certainly not. I agree they're a more agreeable bunch than some others; we have at least some values in common.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    You’re probably right. I wish I had held on to some of my old lunch boxes and comic books. And my Microsoft stock. And my Pinto. Maybe someday the HGTV mavens will be pushing Earth tones and built in fondue pots.
    Around here if a person is shopping for a smaller home, say 1400 sq ft, single story, with a decent sized yard, not built right next to one another, you are most likely looking at an older home. I think one reason those older homes are becoming popular that the empty nest boomers no longer want the mega homes. Very little newer construction that fits those parameters. They are some mighty fine smaller mid-century homes that have been modernized in my area.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    The average home price in the Denver metro area is about $500K. Mostly neither here nor there, but beyond my comprehension and my middle class 50's neighborhood is no where near average but getting there. Makes $482 seem reasonable.

    I think I'd go crunchy granola over snooty rich or white gentrification, assuming they don't overlap. Or heaven forbid a bunch of Republicans like Colorado Springs, which has been rated one of the most conservative cities in the nation. It's never perfect and would be a better place if everyone was like me (ha ha).

    Edit to add: Crunchy over red necks, too.
    Funny you should say that. My brother-in-law is moving from So Cal to Colorado Springs in a couple of months. He says itís getting too difficult for hard-working millionaires like him to make ends meet and raise a family there.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    Funny you should say that. My brother-in-law is moving from So Cal to Colorado Springs in a couple of months. He says it’s getting too difficult for hard-working millionaires like him to make ends meet and raise a family there.
    It could be an effortless transition for him.

    Actually Colorado Springs is a very pretty place with some nice areas and some bad, with plenty of suburban sprawl from new growth. I'm sure your BIL is aware of the demographics. Having lived in various parts of Colorado my whole life it's unpleasant to see how it is growing so fast, crowding the recreation areas, and driving up home prices, but I understand. There used to be a common bumper sticker, Don't Californicate Colorado, but I don't see it around much anymore and now a lot of millennials are coming here from all over.

  9. #49
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    Razz, the Villages is just a huge planned community. 90% Republican and proud of it. Life centers around trying to be like everyone else and other than the carefully planned activities, there is not much in the area. A new grocery store or restaurant is a cause for great celebration. No way any cohousing involved. Not walkable or diverse in any way. But you can get around in a golf cart.

    I think I would die of boredom.

    Our area has a fake community called the Villages of West Clay. Overpriced faux period houses and sections of smaller places and townhouses around a small commercial core. Did not grow organically so the businesses had issues of finding enough customers to keep open. A car is needed to get anywhere as the development is in a big cornfield and not really walkable.

  10. #50
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    builders should consider offering more small houses rather than social engineers trying to talk us all into co-housing.
    I think most of us value our privacy too much these days to live for any length of time with others. It is indeed very hard to find a small house with a yard which is what I would like. They are building over-priced retirement, garden homes here and there in "gated" communities but the ones I have looked at kill my soul. There is an interesting co-housing place here is Colo Springs that has been around quite a while: https://casaverde.us
    I don't get the impression that they are hard-core anything - great location in town too. Their gardens are wonderful to stroll through since they are on the edge of a city wide walking trail.

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