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Thread: I don't qualify as poor any more.....

  1. #31
    Senior Member Teacher Terry's Avatar
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    Razz, I also don’t mind paying taxes. We all need services. Nevada is a low tax state. I do think there’s a happy medium because in some places taxes are so high people can’t afford to stay in paid for homes when they retire.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Yppej's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I've thought municipalities that operate various functions from property tax revenue are going to be flush with new money to spend or squander.
    Maybe they could tackle their unfunded pensions.

  3. #33
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    We've always had a roof over our heads, food on the table and clothes on our backs, so - while we were definitely on the lower end of the income scale - I don't know that I would call us "poor". The kids, however, growing up and seeing all the "stuff" their friends in the big developments had... I think they considered us poor.
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  4. #34
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    I remember once taking the kids to Goodwill, and my son, who was about 11 at the time, not wanting to go in, and saying he hated shopping there and we had "gone poor."
    He always had a funny way with words.

  5. #35
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    I think I've read about some places that proposed charging "income tax" on the imputed income from living in a home you own. Wow.
    That sounds similar to the counties in California before prop 13 who attempted to charge property taxes based on what could be built on the property. The example I recall reading was of an elderly couple in LA that had a small single family home on a decent size corner lot. The same size lot directly across the street from them had the same zoning and had a multi-unit apartment building on it that generated something like 5x the property tax. So LA county decided to increase the elderly couple's property taxes to match those of the apartment building across the street since they theoretically could have torn down their house and built a big apartment building. Stories like that fueled the passage of prop 13, resulting in the absurd property tax variations that now exist almost solely depending on how long one has owned their home.

  6. #36
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    I don't spend $9/day on Starbucks coffee. I only spend $3/day because I make my own coffee.
    What kind of coffee are you making at home that costs $3/day? I make my own coffee but maybe buy one two lb bag of beans every six weeks or so for around $15 which is enough for 10 cups of coffee per week or around $.25/cup. Admittedly my cup is normal size, not starbucks sized. If I had one starbucks sized cup a day I suppose it would be about $.75 to make.

    Admittedly I don't make my coffee with 90% milk as the liquid the way starbucks does, so perhaps that's what the price differential is.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    That sounds similar to the counties in California before prop 13 who attempted to charge property taxes based on what could be built on the property. The example I recall reading was of an elderly couple in LA that had a small single family home on a decent size corner lot. The same size lot directly across the street from them had the same zoning and had a multi-unit apartment building on it that generated something like 5x the property tax. So LA county decided to increase the elderly couple's property taxes to match those of the apartment building across the street since they theoretically could have torn down their house and built a big apartment building. Stories like that fueled the passage of prop 13, resulting in the absurd property tax variations that now exist almost solely depending on how long one has owned their home.
    Some version of that is used in many jurisdictions. It’s called “highest and best use” valuation.

    People have come up with many ways to try getting around it. Some of the big retail chains have advanced “dark store theory” to argue that a store property should be taxed as if it was vacant real estate rather than by its value as a profitable concern. One guy drilled holes in a parking lot, planted some trees, and sued to be valued as agricultural property ( which is taxed at a lower rate in our state).

  8. #38
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    Why is there such an antipathy to paying taxes? I mean that sincerely. I want and need services and expect to pay for them just as I work for revenue and I expect to be paid.....
    Show me any one gubmnt servcie and all of us can find unneeded and silly waste in it.

    ”antipathy to paying taxes” is using a broad brush. Like most citizens, there are services I like and appreciate, and other services that I do not.

    For City services I LOVE the trash people. Our dumpsters sit in alleys and they are huge. I love the trash service so much that I had made special signs thanking trash workers for their service during COVID and I placed those signs on my fence and at our community garden.

    Last month a brand new trash dumpster arrived in my alley not requested by me. Coincidence? Tied to my sign? You decide! Haha.

    But when it comes to the feds...Oy vey. Yesterday I spent more than an hour trying to get service at the Third World institution known as United States post office. Honestly it was like being in one of those foreign countries where you have to bribe people to give you any service. My neighborhood post office doors were locked. They were no signs on the door as to why. This is the third time I’ve gone in recent months to find that they’re either out to lunch and the doors locked or well just doors locked. So I drove a couple miles away to the next neighborhood post office. It was filthy. The parking lot was full. I stood in line and got my business done after 25 minutes. That is pathetic.

    At least a nice lady behind the counter knew what I wanted. First timeI tried to get the special thing I needed my tiny local post office didn’t know how to do it. It is a requirement of rigid Garden Club ladies, otherwise I would just deal with FedEx and stay away from the United States Post Office Third World service which eats tax dollars at an alarming rate.

    I rue the day my mail carrier of 30 years retired. He was wonderful. Since then, service to my house has been chit.

  9. #39
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Honestly though, you can't judge the USPS by what's happened to it since DeJoy was appointed. And it was unfairly forced to fully fund pensions into infinity before that. It used to be a model of efficiency--at least around here. And it's--around here--still a good solid service. It's my observation that when government services that are common to all--aka "the commons"--are suddenly expected to turn a profit, service takes a nosedive.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by razz View Post
    Why is there such an antipathy to paying taxes? I mean that sincerely. I want and need services and expect to pay for them just as I work for revenue and I expect to be paid. I don't haggle with or nickel and dime every business trying to get them to take less for a desired product or service because I want the business to succeed and to be there for future needs. I shop carefully and thoughtfully, most of the time anyway, and pleased if I get a bargain for something I want.

    I am trying to understand. I expect to pay taxes for the services that I receive. Do I use each one; no but I am grateful that each is available. What is the cause or trigger for such resistance? Is it the %age of one's income? Is it the lack of personal control over how taxes are spent? Is it the items or services taxed? Is it personal hoarding or greed? Is it fear of lack or theft by others?

    Or, maybe it is just me being odd in being grateful and will ing to pay for all the amenities, services and life that my grandparents could not even dream about.
    Taxes may be “the price we pay for civilization”, but it doesn’t follow from that that the more taxes we pay the more civilized we become.

    If I feel a private party is overcharging me for something, I can take my business elsewhere. Government doesn’t allow that choice. So I don’t feel particularly grateful for the privilege of paying whatever tax government dreams up. My best protection is voting in ways to keep taxes reasonable and in managing my affairs to minimize my tax liability.

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