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Thread: And now for something different

  1. #21
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Update of the crazy house: it is being picked up in national outlets like “Zillow gone wild” and etc.

    someone flew in from California to see it. The owner, a local real estate agent who bought it from the estate for $125,000 cut off showings after 48 hours and stopped answering his phone. I drove by and saw into the hallway, wow.

    It is sold. I don’t know how much it went for, but my friend who is a real estate agent had a client who put in a full price offer for cash, but he did not get this house. His client was going to use it as a vacation house! Cool idea.

    The house has no central heat or air conditioning, so that is retro. Very few houses in my neighborhood had central heat systems before urban pioneers renovated them. I guess that just was not Mr. King’s priority.

  2. #22
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    Thanks, IL. I find the gray barn floor in the church just dreary...but I am not at all fond of gray. They certainly did make it quite habitable as a home and kept the architectural parts intact...but those gray sliding doors with the pinkish stained glass seem to clash.
    Last edited by nswef; 5-4-21 at 9:43am.

  3. #23
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    So glad the artist's house sold. I really really liked the chapel and the garden. Beautiful spaces.

  4. #24
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Curiosity is my second name as an fyi.

    Does an estate sale set legal limitations on how an estate is disposed of? Was this property not initially advertised as for sale? Was there a conflict of interest in a real estate person buying an estate sale and then flipping it shortly afterwards? Were you surprised that an agent purchased the property and then put it on the market with wider advertising? Is there more to the story due to the estate issues? I know this thread started regarding the uniqueness of the property so feel free to restrict it to that.

    Around here, as I believe is the usual, a real estate agent may purchase property provided there is full disclosure etc. There have also been a significant increase in complaints regarding dubious real estate practices in the news lately - blind bidding and sharing the bids offered https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/ana...ings-1.6009035to bid them up for a better commission etc.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  5. #25
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I think most people in this neighborhood think that the real estate agent who bought it for $120,000-ish got too good of a deal. He did make some improvements such as putting in a bathroom downstairs. He did some painting. And I don’t know how extensive that was, but painting that house would’ve been an interesting challenge


    I know the people involved in in the estate, they are not unsophisticated people. They are attorneys and so they probably wanted it off their hands. They are also very involved in our neighborhood now because the deceased artist left us money in a trust to do interesting projects and events in his memory. Very nice of him.

  6. #26
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Thanks for the additional info, IL.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  7. #27
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    What exactly does "no central heat" mean in St. Louis? In the western half of California that phrase means that the home has a wall furnace or two that one uses to take the chill off in the morning. Or not, if one doesn't mind it being a little cool before the day warms up. In St Louis does it mean, "a fireplace in every room that has to be kept going most of the winter to keep the pipes from freezing?" Or is there some other regional meaning to it?

  8. #28
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Here, it means the place has electric baseboard heating units.

    Gas/forced air furnaces with ductwork for the air to travel through is the most common central heating system here. A few giant Victorians here have their original heating systems, radiator heat where hot water circulates through them. Those were houses of the very rich. Back then, my house was heated with a fireplace in the main rooms and probably a stove in the kitchen.

    My 1927 condo has radiator heat and the condo association is always fussing with the big boilers in the basement.

    I remember those wall furnaces in houses in New Mexico.

  9. #29
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Thanks for the explanation. Electric baseboard heat in that house must cost a small fortune every winter. Here there's a big push to eliminate natural gas anything which is probably fine in the temperate parts of the state because heat pumps are great in places where it doesn't get that cold, but it seems like a dreadful plan for the eastern half of the state. The stove in our house is electric (and practically brand new) but there's a gas hook up in place. I hate the stove. If we ever have to replace it we will get a gas one. Depending on how far in the future that replacement is we may have to drive to Nevada and schlep it back ourselves. Our forced air furnace is gas but original to the house from 1977. We are probably going to replace it this summer with another gas one which would likely last for as long as we live here.

    Random question, was coal a popular heating energy in St. Louis? In Denver almost every house built before WWII used coal. Our house, like most, had a coal chute at the back of the house that had been turned into a small window that opened to a coal room in the basement that had been converted to a bedroom when the house was switched to a gas central furnace. Our furnace was gravity based, so no fan. The ducts were huge (maybe 10 inches diameter) and the vents were all in the central part of the house, not by the outside walls as is standard with a forced air system. It worked ok but the edges of the rooms that were far from the vents were a little chilly on cold days/nights. My high school was still steam radiators heated with coal boilers when I was a student there in the early 80's. They had to have a janitor shoveling coal full time on cold days to keep the boilers boiling. I assume that in the intervening years that it has at least been switched to natural gas fired steam boilers.

  10. #30
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Yes, Coal would have been burned in St. louis houses. The pollution back then was awful.

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