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Thread: Barbaros Adipiscendam

  1. #21
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    In my late twenties/early thirties I was on a mission to read all of Shakespeare. I favored the Bantam paperback annotated versions. Because of my compulsion to keep lists, I can tell you that I read 25 of his plays and then I apparently lost steam. This might be something fun for me to resume in the future. I thought it was really good stuff!
    I would love to hear a lecture on the context of each play when written. I heard a one-hour talk about one of the kings, I believe, and the play became so much more interesting stressing the importance of the verse pattern and sequence of ideas presented. The balance of serious and buffoon was carefully considered. The audience of his time was interesting as well. Shakespeare was a remarkable playright then and now.

    I once sat next to two professors from NY who each year came to see a number of plays because they felt that the timing was so extraordinary at the Stratford Festival, Stratford, ON. It was interesting to talk to them.

    I think my Great Courses has some so will add those to my streaming list as well as 'to watch'. That list is growing.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    When my daughter was at Princeton in the Classics department, her work was mostly in Norse, Old/Middle Irish, West Saxon, and Coptic.
    Given their importance to the shaping of the West, I sometimes wonder why Barbarian Studies doesn’t seem to be a formal discipline.

  3. #23
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    Given their importance to the shaping of the West, I sometimes wonder why Barbarian Studies doesn’t seem to be a formal discipline.
    Right?

    Apparently if you are looking to do a Ph.D. in Classics, this field hasn't been thoroughly plowed...

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    Right?

    Apparently if you are looking to do a Ph.D. in Classics, this field hasn't been thoroughly plowed...
    I once sat next to a history professor on a cross-country flight whose primary interest was systems of public finance during the period from the French Revolution through the end of the Napoleonic Wars. He said much the same thing about other thoroughly studied areas. That if you wanted something new to say, you had to nibble away at the unexplored margins or seek out some extremely specialized area that previous generations of scholars thought too trivial to pursue.

    Or if you were very bold or ideologically committed, you could try reinterpreting history through a different lens such as Marxism or available technology or racial dynamics. He said they were the people who could make academic politics so venomous because their reputations depended on gaining converts and rooting out heresy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    In my late twenties/early thirties I was on a mission to read all of Shakespeare. I favored the Bantam paperback annotated versions. Because of my compulsion to keep lists, I can tell you that I read 25 of his plays and then I apparently lost steam. This might be something fun for me to resume in the future. I thought it was really good stuff!
    I have been listening to an audiobook written and read by Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage. It is amazing to me that after his death, friends of Shakespeare and members of his theatre company published his plays. I gather that it was very unusual at that time to publish plays. Plays were generally performed for audiences, and either failed or succeeded "at the box office".

  6. #26
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    I have been listening to an audiobook written and read by Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage. It is amazing to me that after his death, friends of Shakespeare and members of his theatre company published his plays. I gather that it was very unusual at that time to publish plays. Plays were generally performed for audiences, and either failed or succeeded "at the box office".
    That sounds really interesting - I love Bill Bryson!

  7. #27
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    I have been listening to an audiobook written and read by Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage. It is amazing to me that after his death, friends of Shakespeare and members of his theatre company published his plays. I gather that it was very unusual at that time to publish plays. Plays were generally performed for audiences, and either failed or succeeded "at the box office".
    That does sound a very interesting book to read.
    As Cicero said, “Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.”

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    I have been listening to an audiobook written and read by Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage. It is amazing to me that after his death, friends of Shakespeare and members of his theatre company published his plays. I gather that it was very unusual at that time to publish plays. Plays were generally performed for audiences, and either failed or succeeded "at the box office".
    He wrote another great book about the English language and how it evolved as a sort of patois of other languages called “The Mother Tongue”.

  9. #29
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Bill Bryson has lots of interesting things to say. I will have to see if the library has this book!

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