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Thread: Overloaded thrift shops

  1. #11
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    Here anyway, there is just stuff overload at every thrift store. At one regional chain in particular, it is amazing to see the lines of cars waiting to drop stuff off and the piles of things to sort. The workers can barely keep up with it. Inside, there are pickers looking up values and loading up their carts to sell online.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    Not a sign of a good economy. Just theyíre still overloaded with stuff. Too many people decluttering.
    Or increased consumer spending after the pandemic resulted in decent used items being replaced with the new.
    "what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?" Mary Oliver

  3. #13
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    Stuff at Goodwill seems in increasingly worse condition over time. I have gotten burned a few times and am learning my lesson (so it wasn't a very expensive lesson but nonetheless).
    Trees don't grow on money

  4. #14
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApatheticNoMore View Post
    Stuff at Goodwill seems in increasingly worse condition over time. I have gotten burned a few times and am learning my lesson (so it wasn't a very expensive lesson but nonetheless).
    It amazes me that people will donate items that are ripped, stained, broken, etc. rather than throw them away, and it amazes me even more that the stores go ahead and price them and put them out for sale.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rosarugosa View Post
    It amazes me that people will donate items that are ripped, stained, broken, etc. rather than throw them away, and it amazes me even more that the stores go ahead and price them and put them out for sale.
    AND that people will actually buy them! Reminds me of one of my first town wide yard sales in this home. I put out two watches that were definitely broken (not old or vintage or anything like that). Had a sticker on them saying they were broken. They sold. Made me realize there is usually a buyer for just about anything! You just need to find that buyer. LOL
    To give pleasure to a single heart by a single act is better than a thousand heads bowing in prayer." Mahatma Gandhi
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  6. #16
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    The Goodwill stores here are now pricing men’s shirts of quality at $10. Regular men’s shirts, ones they perceive not to be a great quality are $5. Yesterday I brought home a nice quality cotton shirt for DH that I think should’ve had a price at $10 but it was at $5 so I thought I was getting a “bargain “but it is 100% cotton. I’m sure it will look like a wrinkled mess after he washes it. We don’t iron here.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I helped clear out a house for an estate last year in one of the poorest counties in the state and made several trips to GW. I was surprised at how much of those poor quality items people were buying and walking out with.
    "what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?" Mary Oliver

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