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Thread: Overloaded thrift shops

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    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Overloaded thrift shops

    Friends in different places across the US have told me their local thrift shops have gotten much more selective about what they will take. Guess getting buried in stuff during Covid make them pickier.

    Iím hearing books, clothes, and furniture are the big ones.

    How often do thrift stores keep stuff anyway? I know they will clear out season stuff such as Christmas decorations, but I donít know if they do occasional clean outs.

  2. #2
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Here, the Goodwill store puts Xmas items in storage and hauls them out for the season.


    back several years ago when I was shopping one Goodwill store regularly, I could tell that they cleaned off dishes once a week. I think they just swept things away that has been sitting around for a while. But thatís just one store. Although now it does appear that Goodwill has a uniform pricing policy because I see the same prices on comforters, womenís tops, and womenís pants in this region.

    Iím not sure if they give stores directives for cleaning out items as standard store policy or if each store manager can use their discretion.

    as a longtime thrift store shopper, I noticed when the goodwill stores in the city of St. Louis decided to devote less space to dishes, dinnerware, household, glass, ornamental items. Since thatís what I often go into the stores for, it made a big difference to me.

    Several weeks ago I was in St. Vincent de Paul thrift store and was horrified to see hardly any furniture at all. This is the city thrift store that devotes tons of floor space to furniture so itís the place you go to buy a sofa and etc.. I asked the clerk about it and she said they arenít getting the donations at the moment, but she thinks when tax refunds start coming in people will get new furniture and bring their old stuff to the store.

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    We had/have a customer that owns several. All the furniture, especially the antiques, used to go to one store almost exclusively (found out after one antique walnut dresser showed up at one, needing a paint stripping, green painted walnut, ugh). I haven't seen her since before my surgery and her husband passed a few years ago. Don't know what has happened with her lately.

    However watching some of the thrifters on Youtube, I have seen several posting about things being more expensive in the thrift shops, then the regular stores. I don't know what is up with that, and haven't had time to visit with any of the ones I used to go to occasionally.
    I am here on the computer at work, because Chemo is kicking my rear today, and I have prep to do and get ready for the plumbers tomorrow for replacing a just a month shy of 20 year old water heater.

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    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I'm sorry for the tough day, TMS.
    A few of my favorite local thrifts are extremely nice, like a boutique shopping experience, only everything is really cheap. They are small, secular, charitable organizations, and I direct my best quality donations to them. They are particular about what they will accept, but that logically plays a big role in why these stores offer such a pleasant shopping experience.

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    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I've been dropping off things at the local Goodwill a couple of times a month here and have never been asked anything and there are no notifications. I'm actually amazed at some of the junk I see poking up from other donations and assume some of it must go to a secondary discard stream or the landfill. However, when I've taken a few things to the Habitat Reuse store, they always take a close look at everything are a little picky.

    One could think that when Goodwill won't take decent used items, it could be a sign of a good economy?
    "what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?" Mary Oliver

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    Also sorry for the tough day, TMS. Last time I was at a thrift store was to help a friend drop stuff off from clearing out her dad's house. Sooooo much stuff!!! Haven't been in to shop at one in a long time.
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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post

    Several weeks ago I was in St. Vincent de Paul thrift store and was horrified to see hardly any furniture at all. This is the city thrift store that devotes tons of floor space to furniture so itís the place you go to buy a sofa and etc.. I asked the clerk about it and she said they arenít getting the donations at the moment, but she thinks when tax refunds start coming in people will get new furniture and bring their old stuff to the store.
    Some second-hand outlets are super-picky about furniture. When I am ready to get rid of furniture, it's usually at the stage beyond "gently used." In that case, I try to sell on FB Marketplace--with full disclosure about the condition, or I'll just put it on the curb a few days before trash pick-up and hope someone beats the garbage truck to it.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    There is my favorite Goodwill in the twon 30 miles from me, but on the path to St. louis so I go by it often and stop in. Clean, so clean! I think it is because the merchandise turns over quickly. It is in a brand new facility, so that helps.

    But on the way there I pass two privately owned thift shops that are junky and chock full of merchandise similar to Goodwill with similar prices, just…crowded with stuff. And they have more furniture than “my” Goodwill store which does not attempt to display large pieces.

    and then there is our local auction house in our village which holds a sale once a month. I just stopped in last week to look at their wares and they are always very depressing. Dirty, Cheap stuff. Ugh. Why anyone attends these auctions is beyond me, but we have sold a few things though them.

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I am not looking forward to getting rid of some living room furniture because it will be a PITA.

    I have two bright pink chairs with a custom screen and rug that all go together. I hate to have to haul them into the city of St. Louis to the St. Vincent de Paul store, but I hate even more the idea of giving it free because people never come to get the free stuff. It is so damn irritating.

    and the next few weeks I will have to decide what to do

  10. #10
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    I've been dropping off things at the local Goodwill a couple of times a month here and have never been asked anything and there are no notifications. I'm actually amazed at some of the junk I see poking up from other donations and assume some of it must go to a secondary discard stream or the landfill. However, when I've taken a few things to the Habitat Reuse store, they always take a close look at everything are a little picky.

    One could think that when Goodwill won't take decent used items, it could be a sign of a good economy?
    Not a sign of a good economy. Just they’re still overloaded with stuff. Too many people decluttering.

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